antijacobin

antijacobin

(ˌæntɪˈdʒækəbɪn)
adj
opposed the political activities of the Jacobins
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(30) Blake's war with Titian and Correggio would have been obvious to any readers of the Descriptive Catalogue, which targets the artists as villains, and the review of The Grave in the Antijacobin Review had noted that Blake was "aided as his friends report, by visionary communications with the spirits of the Raffaeles, the Titians, the Caraccis, the Corregios, and the Michael-Angelos of past ages" (Records, 265).
For instance, Hugh Roberts's essay on Shelley's fascination with the antiJacobin writings of Abbe Barruel ("Setting Minds Afloat: Shelley and Barruel in Ireland") seems like something of a missed opportunity.
A few months earlier in the Spectator he completely ravaged Mitford's History for its bias and total absence of veracity: "Mitford's narrative, written and published during the wildest height of Antijacobin phrensy, is vitiated by an intensity of prejudice against whatever bears the name or semblance of popular institutions, which renders his representation of Grecian phaenomena not only false, but in many particulars the direct contrary of the truth" (24: 867-68).
Likewise, these women's writings--Williams' euphorically pro-Revolutionary Letters from France (1790-1796), for example, or Hays's pessimistic novels, which traced un-revolutionized Britain's suppression of female passion, or Hamilton's Antijacobin Memoirs of Modern Philosophers (1800), which featured a portrait of Hays as a francophile flibbertigibbet--took very different approaches when they translated the Revolution Debate's focus on international affairs into a focus on gender relations inside the British home.
Even the eye of imagination, he says, must discover in these postures something of a dark design, nor can they fairly be held in any other light, than as temptations and encouragement to Invasion." As Bell's Weekly Messenger, 4 March 1798, quipped lightly: "The Bishops of Durham and Rochester have discovered, that there may be sedition in the heel of a French dancer, or in the elbow of an Italian fidler!" It would be the task of the Master of the Revels to inspect new performers as much as the text of new plays and "make it a point to ascertain that every step is strictly in unison with the principles of the British Constitution, and that every attitude is completely Antijacobin!" (Morning Chronicle, 5 March 1798).
Hayden, 'only one periodical, the Antijacobin Review, had nerve enough to defend it [Southey's Vision]' (The Romantic Reviewers, 1802-1824 (London, 1968), 118).
The Gentleman's Magazine stresses that Clare is "a man of vivid perception and strong feeling," but that his abilities are directed solely toward the depiction of natural scenes; he is "unacquainted with the art and reserve of the world, and with the riches, rules, and prejudices of literature." The Antijacobin, likewise, reports that the author is "a poet in humble life, whose genius has burst through the fetters" of his poverty.
Significantly, by the time of Lyrical Tales' publication (November 1800), two more favorable reviews of Lyrical Ballads had appeared, one in October 1799 in the British Critic and another in April 1800 in the Antijacobin Review.