antiknock


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to antiknock: antiperspirant

an·ti·knock

 (ăn′tĭ-nŏk′)
n.
A substance, such as tetraethyl lead, added to gasoline to reduce engine knock.

antiknock

(ˌæntɪˈnɒk)
n
(Automotive Engineering) a compound, such as lead tetraethyl, added to petrol to reduce knocking in the engine

an•ti•knock

(ˌæn tiˈnɒk, ˌæn taɪ-)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or being a material added to fuel for an internal-combustion engine to eliminate or minimize knock.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiknock - any of various compounds that are added to gasoline to reduce engine knockingantiknock - any of various compounds that are added to gasoline to reduce engine knocking
lead tetraethyl, tetraethyl lead - a clear oily poisonous liquid added to gasoline to prevent knocking
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
Adj.1.antiknock - suppressing or eliminating engine knock in combustion engines; "antiknock properties"; "antiknock rating"
leaded - treated or mixed with lead; "leaded gasoline"; "leaded zinc"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In a large number of alternative fuels, methanol displays fine combustion properties similar to gasoline and has such advantages as high octane number, low emissions, antiknock, rich resource, mature technology, etc.
Regular Gasoline: Gasoline having an antiknock index, i.
motor gasoline antiknock better, lower sulfur content and so on.
However, due to historical reasons Research Octane and Motor Octane Numbers are still the metrics used to characterize a fuel's antiknock quality.
The main source of this atmospheric lead is the combustion in vehicles of fuel containing the antiknock additive.
Also , Lead emissions are associated with the use of lead compounds in gasoline as antiknock agents [12] .
Control over combustion quality and improvement in the antiknock properties of petrol engines through the use of oxygenates has become widely accepted practise.
For example, gasoline retailers use different proprietary additives such as antiknock compounds, blending agents, antirust agents, and anti-icing agents.
Enriched fuel with additives like ignition accelerators, antiknock agents.
The industry feverishly sought an antiknock additive.