antilynching

antilynching

(ˌæntɪˈlɪntʃɪŋ)
adj
opposed to lynching, acting against lynching
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Her fight for equality and her antilynching campaigns which brought her to Edgbaston, are aligned to Birmingham's rich heritage of supporting social justice.
Wells was a journalist and antilynching crusader who risked her safety to expose the truths about why black men and boys were lynched.
Upon his return to Washington, he proposed an antilynching law to Congress.
Proposing a revised history of American art, "America Is Hard to See" mixes perennial favorites (Alexander Calder's Circus, 1926-31; Edward Hopper's Early Sunday Morning, 1930) with rarely seen works, such as an antilynching print Jose Clemente Orozco made while visiting the US in 1933 and a 1967 Vietnam War protest drawing by Judith Bernstein, in which military tombstones have been refashioned into phallic silhouettes crowned with American flags.
Wells's fearless antilynching campaign and the roles modern black women have assumed--on behalf of their sons and other slain black men.
(172) Garland, supra note 165, at 34-35 ("the contemporary American death penalty has, in important respects been designed to be an antilynching....
Because states offered very little refuge for blacks from lynch mobs, antilynching activists turned to the federal government.
But before his overt campaign against American lynching culture was curtailed by censorship, Hughes entered into his most prolific period of antilynching poetry.
Bold but uneven activism, including efforts of the NACW and other women's groups (which generated a certain gender anxiety from conservative male leaders), coalesced in the NAACP's antilynching crusade.
For instance, a commentary on racial intolerance, the ironically tilled and incisive lithograph Southern Holiday (1935, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York) appeared in two antilynching exhibitions the year that it was made; Southern Holiday shows a muscular, naked, cast rated African American man lied to a broken column.
"Antilynching Plays: Angelina Weld Grimke, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, and the Evolution of African American Drama." Post-Bellum, Pre-Harlem: African American Literature and Culture, 1877-1919.