antimodern

antimodern

(ˌæntɪˈmɒdən)
adj
opposed to modern attitudes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps we could call this antimodern, but only if we understand that an anti concept can only exist alongside (not prior to) the thing it opposes.
Fox writes of the movement, "Antimodern and skeptical of technological progress, it invoked a vision of pre-industrial community when people lived closer to the land and the natural rhythms of life." (18)
That Woolf saw these primitive motifs as subversive of the present social order is suggested by the fact that the Ramsay daughters--who harbor "infidel ideas" against English feminine domesticity--are the most receptive to the antimodern, disorienting forces of the island.
McLuhan was a dichotomy-loving holist; an antimodern modernizer; a technological determinist who hoped to expand human autonomy; a celebrator of tactile, phenomenological experience who remained consistently abstract and conceptual; a cultural conservative effusing about a dawning new age; a thoroughly literary thinker who seemed to revel in what he deemed the twilight of literary thinking.
It has promoted the spread of antimodern, and in some respects deliberately anti-Western, currents of thought all across the Islamic world," see Kuran, Islam and Mammon, IX.
First, "The Harshaw Bride" and The Exile of the Lariat complicate the stereotype of the antimodern West and the uses of that mythology by the electrical industry to gain public support.
Most react and reject, and develop theories and ideas that are clear antecedents of the antimodern and anti-enlightenment movements, ideologies, parties, and jihads with which we're contending today.
The final chapter, "Turning South Again" opens with a discussion of Mary Landrieu and George Allen's Senate Resolution 39, which "called for a formal apology by the Senate to lynching victims and their descendants," and establishes the book's fuller socio-political context (210), emphasizing Hinrichsen's point that the value of understanding "the construction of the South as backward, damaged, and antimodern was part of larger national interests" is that it encourages us to break the cycle of mindless repetition that avoids confronting trauma (212).
The Liutsinskii affair is significant for exploring just how far the popular press could mobilize religion for political ends, as a means of recasting the Jewish faith as an antimodern, coercive, authoritarian religion.