antimodernist

antimodernist

(ˌæntɪˈmɒdənɪst)
adj
opposed to modernism
n
a person opposed to modernism
References in periodicals archive ?
While none of Blondel's works was explicitly condemned, his apologetics of immanence was targeted by the antimodernist encyclical of Pius X, Pascendi Dominici Gregis, promulgated in 1907.
Presently, a cohort of Russian intellectuals led by the contemporary artist and theorist Dmitry Gutov has been working to stage a philosophical reevaluation of Lifshitz's public 1960s antimodernist stance.
Do we want to interpret it as the home of thousands of madressahs that are producing armies of backward-looking, violent, radical youth or as the country where the antimodernist political parties have seldom broken out of single digits in any election?'
An ultra-conservative Catholic, Casey saw little difference in the antimodernist beliefs of the Wahhabi House of Saud and the antimodernist, anti-enlightenment views of the newly installed Polish Pope, John Paul II.'
The resulting text earned him a reputation as a hard-line antimodernist, but also resonated uncannily with the contemporary insights of Guy Debord's Society of the Spectacle (1968) and Peter Burger's Theory of the AvantGarde (1974).
As it cuts across the assumptions of technological modernity, the bevel invokes a poetics of edges that blunts the text's ostensibly antimodernist profile.
Tolkien has been depicted both as an antimodernist environmentalist on the one hand and a racist allegorist of the Second World War on the other.
Paradoxically, Sveshnikov's programmatic article synthesized tendencies that were modernist and antimodernist. On the one hand, it relied heavily on essentializing concepts, such as "authenticity" (samobytnost'), "connection to life" (sviaz's zhizn 'iu), and "creative surges" (tvorcheskie poryvy).
McLuhan responded enthusiastically to the antimodernist strain in Chesterton's work, concentrated as it was upon <<personal liberty, the sanctities of the family, [and] the traditions of Christian Europe that were opposed to both socialism and rampant capitalism>> (16).
A second contemporary arena of discourse in which Fuller's example is badly needed, I think, is that surrounding the "public intellectual." Since the antimodernist backlash sparked by the antiSemitic Dreyfus affair in France in the 1890s, the term "intellectual" has often referred--initially pejoratively but then positively--to a person of learning and ideas who makes judgments about politics and culture against or at least outside established institutions of power.
(29.) For example the province of Nova Scotia tapped into antimodernist themes in its tourist brochures.
Brown shows how the particular association struck between an antimodernist standpoint and the "little Englandism" in the pronouncements of figures such as Kingsley Amis crucially hit a nerve among Caribbean writers who were already having to deal with the dismal racism of the imperial metropolis.