antimusic

antimusic

(ˈæntɪˌmjuːzɪk)
n
any form of music intended to overthrow traditional conventions and expectations
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"The current knee-jerk, overreactive surge of antimusic mania, fueled by preachers, 'concerned parents,' and exploitative politicians, may seem like something dreadfully new, a threat unparalleled in world history.
They are so unbelievably horrible, so appallingly unmusical, so dogmatically insensitive to the magic of the art, that they qualify as the crowned heads of antimusic." Though his original judgment about the Beatles, as Buckley delicately concedes, was unfortunate, the spirit in which it was rendered is captivating.
The esteem that sacred music is given in the play is a radical departure from the perverted liturgy and the profane songs of Three Laws and King Johan and the antimusic wrath of many of Bale's prose tracts.
In particular, Albarn's own renown places him in a position already defined by the accumulated history of the field such that whatever he ends up doing will be defined as music (as opposed to politics, critique or antimusic).
But it is worth pausing, we think, to ask ourselves what it means that an institution like the Times should lavish such attention to discriminate for its readers between the merits of "grunge," "heavy metal" "punk," and other species of nihilistic antimusic. Mr.
In the work of Marcel Duchamp and John Cage, both the subjects of strong essays here, musical composition becomes a kind of "antimusic," aural koans that are offered to highlight the epistemological activity of the listener.