antinarrative

antinarrative

(ˈæntɪˌnærətɪv)
n
a narrative which does not adhere to the usual conventions of narrative
References in periodicals archive ?
Featuring imagined characters, self-projection figures, and a cat, combined with historical memory, myths, and biblical stories, Mikhailichenko and Nesis discuss the question of sacrifice and create a metaphysical antinarrative.
Time lines narrativize what would otherwise appear as an antinarrative and antihermeneutic development of spatial-structural digital archives that could risk cutting off links back to the bridging of cosmic and experiential time.
What she produces instead is a complex and nuanced study, one that might be termed an "antiheroic antinarrative.
In ten essays, the collection transcends narrow conceptions of narrative, antinarrative, and metanarrative.
However, what is missing in such postmodern readings is the important tension that the novel sets up between the theoretical and narrative aspects of the text: it is in this tension that we see the significance of narrative in relation to identity and lived experience, even or especially in light of the purportedly antinarrative culture in which we find ourselves.
Lest this Adornian "respite from regimentation" be interpreted as "too privatized" (and Eurocentric), said concludes tellingly by demonstrating the "public" (and Eastern) face of this revocational vocation--this radical antinarrative sense of "beginning"--in the provocative words of "an Islamic intellectual like Ali Shariati, "a prime force in the early days of the Iranian Revolution, when his attack on 'the true, straight path, this smooth and sacred highway'--organized orthodoxy--contrasted with the devastations of constant migration":
Erecting his structures on the flat, unstable plain of a perpetual present, Liu gives form to a kind of antinarrative, not so much evoking history as figuring its loss.
Postmodernist long poems, according to Brian McHale, are sometimes narrative in impulse, but they include "intractably antinarrative texts" too (3-6).
We think the text uses antinarrative techniques for ethical, political, ideological reasons; that is, we trust the narrator/author.
35) In such antinarrative modernism, fragmentation is not balanced with a movement toward wholeness, as is Welch's work, nor are the ephemeral incidents of the story line bound up in an ultimately coherent frame.
1) through a Freudian lens, Shaw says that Walker "is re-membering an antinarrative that exists in a place before memory and beyond it, always familiar, yet resoundingly alien" (42).