antinationalist

antinationalist

(ˌæntɪˈnæʃənəlɪst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who is opposed to nationalism
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to nationalism
References in periodicals archive ?
This unpopular and antinationalist decision had hurt the Nepali people.
All the other parties --the antinationalist Citizens (Cs), the People's Party (PP), the Catalan Socialist Party (PSC) and Catalonia Yes We Can (CSQP), a coalition of leftists of which the nationwide Podemos is a part--opposed unilateral secession.
18) This is antinationalist, noting the meanness and isolation of the home-place, but escape proves impossible: Johnny is in prison and his story is told in retrospect, like a Wild West ballad.
While Shkandrij is correct that the opening of archives has allowed for "myths" to be dispelled, it is important not only to do more archival research but also to recognize how myths were created in the first place--in East and West, antinationalist and nationalist--and, last but not least, why they are still with us (276).
Even so, the historian recalls many quarrels with Orwell during the Second World War over the pacifist and antinationalist stances of anarchists such as himself and Herbert Read, a mutual friend (26-28).
36) Mimicking the very content of the poem by suggesting that the poet must have been possessed by a malevolent spirit in order to write such criticism of her nation, responses to the piece collapsed "unpatriotic" or antinationalist speech with demonic possession.
The ways that homeland orientation and belonging shape conceptions of diaspora continue to be debated within diaspora studies; however, I draw primarily on the work of scholars who suggest that diaspora conceptions of identity and homeland orientation need to be understood as hybrid, antiessentialist and antinationalist (Gilroy 1993; Hall 1990; Lukose 2007).
1999 "Marginal Narratives and Shifty Natives: Ironic Ethnography as Antinationalist Discourse".
The second half of the poem, in other words, has not merely a uniquely antinationalist historical form, but also a corresponding set of implications for the future of international relations.
Accordingly, Nietzsche's family background--Lutheran, clerical, and royalist--likely played a formative role in his own political development: he was descended from Lutheran pastors; he was named after the reigning king of Prussia; and even though he had become a Swiss citizen, he volunteered for the Prussian Army in 1870 (serving as a medical orderly), evidence that he still valued his national identity despite the cosmopolitan, antinationalist character of his philosophical works.
At first sight, this conclusion may seem surprising, since colonial states were typically antinationalist, and often violently so.
Daniel Boyarin's Unheroic Conduct all but argues for an antinationalist, anti-imperialist tradition in the culture of rabbinical study, while Jonathan Boyarin has repeatedly saluted "the powers of diaspora.