antinomianism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

an·ti·no·mi·an·ism

 (ăn′tĭ-nō′mē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Christianity The doctrine or belief that the Gospel frees Christians from required obedience to any law, whether scriptural, civil, or moral, and that salvation is attained solely through faith and the gift of divine grace.
2. The belief that moral laws are relative in meaning and application as opposed to fixed or universal.

antinomianism

the belief that Christians are freed from the moral law by the virtue of God’s grace. — antinomian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
the theological doctrine maintaining that Christians are freed from both moral and civil law by God’s gift of grace. — antinomian, antinomist, n.
See also: Law
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antinomianism - the theological doctrine that by faith and God's grace a Christian is freed from all laws (including the moral standards of the culture)
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in classic literature ?
She was great at Antinomianism and Bible- classes, and was plainly going to hold a class now.
The populace think that your rejection of popular standards is a rejection of all standard, and mere antinomianism; and the bold sensualist will use the name of philosophy to gild his crimes.
Mysticism, with its marvellous power of making common things strange to us, and the subtle antinomianism that always seems to accompany it, moved him for a season; and for a season he inclined to the materialistic doctrines of the Darwinismus movement in Germany, and found a curious pleasure in tracing the thoughts and passions of men to some pearly cell in the brain, or some white nerve in the body, delighting in the conception of the absolute dependence of the spirit on certain physical conditions, morbid or healthy, normal or diseased.
I'll send it over to you; and there are some other books that you may like to see, Irwine--pamphlets about Antinomianism and Evangelicalism, whatever they may be.
Others devoted themselves to the worrying of churches and meetings for public worship; and the fertile forms of antinomianism among the elder puritans seemed to have their match in the plenty of the new harvest of reform.
Apostates, arguing that Lay "attach[ed] the uncompromising spirit of antinomianism to the antislavery cause" (86, 144).
As Mulligan explains, "keening" posits performance with a transformative power to reintegrate the deceased person's body, which is thus "broken yet narratively restored." In a related yet different way, the body is a site of literary semiosis in Judith Coleman's "Performing Orthodox Heresy: Mary, Antinomianism, and the Transgressive Female Body in N-Town's 'Trial of Mary and Joseph."' In it, Coleman explores a central idea in Claire's first book: the body's function as a "screen" for external events and situations.
Topics of the selections include free grace from The First Part of an Equal Check to Pharisaism and Antinomianism (1774), unbelief from A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians (1797), heart religion from Practical Piety (1811), spiritual authority from A Treatise on the Nation and Constitution of the Christian Church (1773), and Irish Catholicism from The Christian Duty of Granting the Claims of the Roman Catholics (1827).
In all of these efforts a few accusations rose to the top: accusations of anti-Trinitarianism linked to denial of infant baptism and accusations of antinomianism as a result of the former.
(8) Linking Marut/Traven's anarchism and incipient antinomianism to contemporary political and social conditions, Guthke suggests the following in his biography: The "nominally dynastic European social and political order was ripe for its demise in the capitalist age....
"Whitman Antinomianism and Buddhist Antinomianism." International Conference on Advanced Education and Management (Guilin, China: Destech Publicat, 2015), 450-453.