antinomical

antinomical

(ˌæntɪˈnɒmɪkəl)
adj
characterized by or prone to antinomy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Navigating the antinomical ideas that education can be both empowering and destructive, Indigenous education leaders in what is currently Oklahoma (1) are building coalitions toward education that is humanizing for Native American students.
It would have been truer to say that later Muslims were in general less able to make, of two antinomical statements--as for example the Qur'anic affirmation that man is responsible for his actions and that his actions are predestined--a synthesis through which they might perceive the spiritual truth in question.
These multiple and antinomical Antigones embody different responses to the call of the other, and, most significantly, to the call of the unfamiliar other, the 'stranger'.
(42) He later comes to regard 'existence' as antinomical to thought, encouraged, perhaps, by the fact that, after the Science of Logic, Hegel's concept (or 'notion') loses its spirit (intersubjectivity).
in the men, other than what they can provide by way of antinomical
The Law and the laws, therefore, are antinomical: moreover,
Emerging around 1512, some fifty years before the writing of "Of Coaches," Erasmus's notion of copia represents the type of forward-thinking and enlightened discursive strategy that stands in stark contrast to the antinomical writing that was coming back from the New World.
(92) Florovsky used the expression "theology of the abnormal" to describe any ecclesiology written in the context of the paradoxical, antinomical, and abnormal situation in which Christianity is divided among "separate brethren" while also being one church.
This new situation is antinomical since what is accidental is in the same time perennial, identical, and what is substance, is also attribute, variability.
It is the preoccupation of the captive mind to indulge in the use of such imported concepts without a proper and meaningful linkage to the objective situation." African, Asian and Latin American sociologists, in many cases, seem to have assimilated the same vision, as Sitas (2002:11) points out: "The only way out for many southern sociologists is the quietism of borrowing from antinomical and critical concepts from discourses incubated in the Centre....
It is the antinomical moment: nonrecognition becomes a form of recognition.