antiparticle


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an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Every particle of matter has a corresponding antiparticle, identical in every way, but with an opposite charge.
One possible theory explaining the absence of antimatter is that of neutrinos, the ghostly particle which may acts as its own antiparticle, holding the ability to produce matter as well as antimatter version of itself.
Cui's team looked at data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which collects particle (and antiparticle) data from aboard the International Space Station.
An experiment proposed by Stanford theorists finds evidence for the Majorana fermion, a particle that's its own antiparticle. StanfordNews Service, 20 July 2017, http://news.stanford.edu/press/view/15528
'If the particle is its own antiparticle they will annihilate each other, giving off energy.'
Positrons, as antiparticle of the electron, are described as electrons moving backwards in time.
While still at Bell Labs, Chu began working specifically on the most fundamental atom, consisting of an electron and its antiparticle. He also worked on the motion of energy in disordered materials.
Like Feynman, Krauss also relishes the quirky surprises that science sometimes throws at researchers, recalling his own thrill when first seeing that Feynman's Nobel work "explained how an antiparticle could be thought of as a particle going backward in time." That's right, backward and forward in time, with just the bouncy perspective Feynman personified.
These virtual particles, albeit short-lived, behave very violently, colliding with each other and annihilating each other in a burst of energy when particle and antiparticle collide.
I rather like the physics definition of annihilation, and I would like to see it applied to the battlefield: the phenomenon in which a particle or antiparticle (call that a philosophy, idea, or doctrine) as an electron and a positron (call those warriors), disappears with a resultant loss of energy approximately equal to the sum of their masses.
It was the antiparticle to the electron, later called the positron.