antiparticle


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Related to antiparticle: antiquark

an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
If a particle and an antiparticle meet, they disappear by emitting two photons or a pair of some other particles.
Despite being its own antiparticle, this special particle wouldn't be a fermion.
Positrons, as antiparticle of the electron, are described as electrons moving backwards in time.
Like Feynman, Krauss also relishes the quirky surprises that science sometimes throws at researchers, recalling his own thrill when first seeing that Feynman's Nobel work "explained how an antiparticle could be thought of as a particle going backward in time.
When] protons and neutrons cease to exist, they may in turn decay into electrons and their antiparticle partners, positrons.
I rather like the physics definition of annihilation, and I would like to see it applied to the battlefield: the phenomenon in which a particle or antiparticle (call that a philosophy, idea, or doctrine) as an electron and a positron (call those warriors), disappears with a resultant loss of energy approximately equal to the sum of their masses.
It was the antiparticle to the electron, later called the positron.
The hunt for a long-sought particle that does not have a distinct antiparticle twin might be over.
I don't doubt I'd be pants at puffing hard in hot places, and though I do know some cracking science words, like positron (that's your basic electron antiparticle, of course), my knowledge of physics is full of black holes.
This is why every charged particle has an antiparticle.
When a particle and its antiparticle meet, they completely annihilate each other in a flash of pure energy.
The conundrum for anti-dialectical official physics is that the existence of antiparticle itself is problematic.