antiparty

antiparty

(ˌæntɪˈpɑːtɪ)
adj
opposed to a political party or to political parties
References in periodicals archive ?
Here is another suggestion to him: besides the ignorant, apathetic, and pseudo-independents who habitually lean to one side, there is in American opinion an element of the traditional antiparty feeling mentioned above.
Professor Alan Ware, for example, rejects the traditional "heroic" account that "direct primary legislation was sponsored by Progressive reformers who were intent on curbing the power of political parties," insisting that "[p]arty politicians were not the 'victims' of antiparty reformers who somehow imposed a debilitating reform on them.
But, unlike many people her age, Hailee isn't really a rebel without a cause-she just wants to be left alone and discover the intricacies of life and love her way, as she discloses in the antiparty anthem, Hell Nos and Headphones.
In this fine book, the author shows how the presidential election of 1796 was conducted within the antiparty leadership by all concerned for the public good ideology of the founding era.
Antiparty politics and the restructuring of the Italian party system.
He was executed for being a "traitor to the nation for all ages who perpetrated antiparty, counterrevolutionary factional acts in a bid to overthrow the leadership of [the Korean Workers'] party and state and the socialist system," among other crimes (Korea Central News Agency 2013).
Following its poor performance in the European elections, the Pirate Party, no longer the exciting newcomer, now formally takes a place in European political history among the many fringe and antiparty parties (cf.
The report delineated two distinct forms of antiparty activity in Belorussia.
KEYWORDS: New parties, local politics, intraparty conflict, decentralization, Japan, chief executives, local party systems, de-aligned voters, urban-rural divide, antiparty sentiment
In some cities, anti-Japan protests turned into antigovernment, antiparty demonstrations instead, striking out at the Communist Party's one-party rule, bureaucratic corruption, the widening wealth gap and scarce jobs for university graduates.
Kamp points out, "although it was evident that some clergy incited the murders of the unveiled and that much of Uzbek male society opposed the party's efforts to change women's social roles, the murder wave was not solely the fault of antiparty forces.
The antiparty spirit has surged forth on many occasions in American history--among the abolitionists, for example, and in the Civil War Confederacy, with its single-term six-year presidency, a classic political design for minimizing partisan conflict.