antiperistasis


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antiperistasis

(ˌæntɪˌpɛrɪˈstælsɪs)
n
a real or imagined process in which one part increases the force of an opposing part
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The response became part of the oral folklore of that generation of American anti-imperialists, and with the USA invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq the phrase is alive again as part of the general imperial antiperistasis (contrariness to the surroundings).
I am also going to suggest without long theological argument that it is in the heart of the earth, the belly of the beast, and the underground where the furious power of antiperistasis may be found, and, to the extent that those expressions are grounded, that grounding lies in the commons.
There Ficino takes note of the "reciprocal interchange of the elements" to argue that the sun "makes the water evaporate in mists and from the water gives birth to air." The imagined natural philosopher would have recalled the Aristotelian language of antiperistasis (present in Aristotle, Meteorology, 1.3, 1.9, and elsewhere), where Aristotle discussed elemental exchange.
(17) Despite being at opposite ends of the spectrum, the minimal pair estoffer/estoufer, whose anamorphic similarity adds to their visual impact and is likely to confuse the inattentive reader, mutually enhance each other in a display of Montaignian antiperistasis. (18) It has become clear by now that the diligent reader has to consider both sides of the coin in order to comprehend the full extent of any given problem.
(25) The antiperistasis is expressed via another contrast reminiscent of "Des boyteux:" the latent possibilities and limitations of the human mind.
In addition, there is inconsistency in the explanation of Greek technical terms: note 12 (197) explains "antiperistasis" but there is no corresponding note on prolepsis (247).
To return to the idea of self-preservation, conservatio sui: Telesio developed this notion largely in the realm of natural philosophy and specifically with respect to the question of antiperistasis, a word which Aristotle had used to designate a kind of reciprocal replacement, of the sort that occurs, say, when hail forms because a relatively cold cloud sinks to a relatively warmer region, is surrounded by the warmth, contracts, and produces hail.