antiphon


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an·ti·phon

 (ăn′tə-fŏn′)
n.
1. A devotional composition sung responsively as part of a liturgy.
2.
a. A short liturgical text chanted or sung responsively preceding or following a psalm, psalm verse, or canticle.
b. Such a text formerly used as a response but now rendered independently.
3. A response; a reply: "It would be truer ... to see [conservation] as an antiphon to the modernization of the 1950s and 1960s" (Raphael Samuel).

[Late Latin antiphōna, sung responses; see anthem.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antiphon

(ˈæntɪfən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a short passage, usually from the Bible, recited or sung as a response after certain parts of a liturgical service
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a psalm, hymn, etc, chanted or sung in alternate parts
3. any response or answer
[C15: from Late Latin antiphōna sung responses, from Late Greek, plural of antiphōnon (something) responsive, from antiphōnos, from anti- + phōnē sound]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•ti•phon

(ˈæn təˌfɒn)

n.
1. a verse, prayer, or song to be chanted or sung in response.
2. a text recited or sung before or after some part of the liturgical service.
[1490–1500; < Medieval Latin antiphōna responsive singing < Greek, neuter pl. of antíphōnos sounding in answer]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiphon - a verse or song to be chanted or sung in responseantiphon - a verse or song to be chanted or sung in response
church music, religious music - genre of music composed for performance as part of religious ceremonies
gradual - (Roman Catholic Church) an antiphon (usually from the Book of Psalms) immediately after the epistle at Mass
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

antiphon

[ˈæntɪfən] Nantífona f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

antiphon

[ˈæntɪfən] n (Rel) → antifona
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Angelo; the antiphon Regina Coeli which the Catholic church sings
Then again there is Lysanias of Sphettus, who is the father of Aeschines--he is present; and also there is Antiphon of Cephisus, who is the father of Epigenes; and there are the brothers of several who have associated with me.
Today each period of the divine office is comprised of several psalms, each bookended with an antiphon (like a refrain) and a doxology (a proclamation of praise to God).
This anthology contains a selection of seven essays from the pages of Antiphon: A Journal for Liturgical Renewal, the official organ of the Society For Catholic Liturgy.
White, represented by Jevon Jaconi of Antiphon Law offices in Green Bay, did not contest OLR's request to dismiss that one count, but did contest five counts of misconduct and contended that the referee overseeing the case should instead recommend a 5-month license suspension.
Her poems and book reviews have appeared in publications throughout North America and the UK including "Stirring," "Naugatuck River Review," "CALYX," "The Curlew," and "Antiphon." Her third collection, Thin Places, was released by Kelsay Books in 2017.
There is an ancient antiphon of the church which states:"Three wonders mark this day we celebrate: today the star led the Magi to the manger; today water was changed into wine at the marriage feast; today Christ desired to be baptized by John to bring us salvation, alleluia."
The entrance antiphon in today's masses, "Rejoice in the Lord always," (Gaudete in Domino semper) serves to remind the faithful of the significance of Christ's birth.
It likewise makes a perfect antiphon at the beginning of the Mass.
It is named after the first word of the entrance antiphon, "Gaudete in Domino semper," meaning "Rejoice in the Lord always" (Phil.
The Third Sunday of Advent is defined by the antiphon: 'Rejoice!