antiphrastic

Related to antiphrastic: undoctored

antiphrastic

(ˌæntɪˈfræstɪk) or

antiphrastical

adj
relating to antiphrasis
Translations
antifrastico
References in periodicals archive ?
At a medicinal level is used as anti-diarrheal, anti-diabetic and antiviral, to treat malaria and antiphrastic and insecticidal,(5).
Periphrastic antonomasias are used for the Minister of Tourism in connection to her spouse's business ("the blonde from Golden Blitz"), to her immoral behavior ("the maiden from Plescoi"; the appellative bears the antiphrastic stamp), (revistaflacara.
The antiphrasis, then, is not only the irony of the name Mignonne, but it is the antiphrastic reversal of his own perception as well: he sees not the panther before him, passive and sated from a recent meal, but rather the dangerous knife-wielding Mignonne, the lover from his past who reflects his own violence.
At the same time, it is an antiphrastic (contrastive) structure and evaluative strategy.
References to the pastoral in this poem are ironically antiphrastic.
cohyponymic transfer, antiphrasis, auto-antonomy, and auto-converseness, the absence of pertinent cases may simply be due to their great rareness; nothing, for example, should prevent in principle a diminutive pattern from turning into an augmentative one through extended antiphrastic use of diminutives, followed by a reinterpretation (e.
The transcendent, with antiphrastic irony; is at pains to identify itself as impure.
Per mia fortuna: to begin an account of one's experience of Auschwitz with these antiphrastic words is a tour de force of the sardonic.
The decoding of ironic parody is antiphrastic - the reader is expected to perform a "semantic inversion" of the text's stated meaning (52-53).
This sonnet has all the ingredients of the neniale tradition: extensive use of the suffix -oco, parody of the high-style (especially Petrarchan) descriptio mulieris, grotesque exaltation of awkward physical traits, paradoxical and often antiphrastic similes, and explicit allusions to earthy, carnal desire, but especially the distinctive linguistic trait attributed to Mugello-speakers by Lorenzo de' Medici, Luigi Pulci, and others, the generalization of the voiced velar sound gh to replace standard Italian voiced palatal sound gl (although, as illustrated by Arrigo Castellani, gh is the legitimate Florentine result for words containing Latin-GL-): gighioco, voghia, dorghi, ghaghiardoco, cighio.
References to children such as little mites, or as, in French, morpions, moucherons, or tetards are also basically antiphrastic and hyperbolic in nature: the emphasis is on size, not nastiness.