antipoverty

an·ti·pov·er·ty

 (ăn′tē-pŏv′ər-tē, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Created or intended to alleviate poverty: antipoverty programs.

antipoverty

(ˌæntɪˈpɒvətɪ)
adj
(Social Welfare) acting against poverty
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This plea is, in essence, a call to recognize and emphasize the strand of centralized, bipartisan antipoverty policymaking that has continued in the shadows of more prominent deliberations, most of them decentralized and experimental, about grand solutions.
I am reassured that my concerns are understood and that the Government remains committed to its antipoverty agenda."
At that time, Mitchell, an antipoverty advocate for the mayor, was known as the "link between the militant civil rights groups and the city administration," reported The Baltimore Sun.
As one antipoverty activist put it, "How society treats its workers says much about our values and priorities."
More sly and illegal behavior came to light when one of Fox's former allies, Arnulfo Montes Cuen, accused Fox of diverting government money from antipoverty programs to Calderon's campaign coffers.
The NCW recommends that the federal government work to develop a national, comprehensive antipoverty strategy.
The rocker and antipoverty campaigner will talk about his less publicised media work, which contributed to his estimated pounds 35 million fortune.
A more effective antipoverty policy is the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes paid by low-wage workers.
From that perspective, Wal-Mart has been one of the most successful antipoverty programs in America.
Between November 1964 and June 1969, Congress allotted nearly $7 billion to antipoverty programs.
Yet the largest financier of antipoverty programs for the developing world continues to ignore its own 2003 report.