antipress

antipress

(ˌæntɪˈprɛs)
adj
opposed to or acting against the press
References in periodicals archive ?
Gary Shipton added: "The antipress measures in the Data Protection Bill represent a clear and present danger to local journalism."
The right-wing political movement that developed in the 1950s and 1960s, including media pundits such as William Safire and the anticommunist and antipress Sen.
The Committee to Protect Journalists, an international watchdog, blasted out the grim statistics to the world in a report last year: "In the Philippines, a country long plagued by deadly, antipress violence, CPJ confirmed that three journalists were killed in reprisal for their work, and is investigating the motive in another six murders.
Exiled journalist Wilf Mbanga spotted a loophole in Mugabe's stringent antipress laws that allow the importation of newspapers printed outside the country.
Aside from the problem of enforcing such antipress laws in a society in which the Internet is an increasingly dominant force and bloggers are rapidly replacing reputable reporters, Posner has the problem exactly backward.
Eventually, the Mugabe government passed a stringent antipress law, the innocuously named Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA), which gave the government the power to close newspapers and to ban both foreign and Zimbabwean journalists from working in the country.
I interpreted it as antipress, which shows how narrow-minded we in the press can be.
Not a single attack on a journalist has ever been solved or anybody held accountable for antipress violence under the Menem-Duhalde government.
Within Antall's party, the Hungarian Democratic Forum, the cheerleader of antipress sentiment was until recently a stubborn ex-writer named Istvan Csurka.
"Jack was the right man for that difficult time, with the Nixon Administration pursuing an antipress agenda," recalled Floyd McKay, NF '68, who wrote a 2004 journalism monograph on the early days of the committee.