antipsychiatry


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antipsychiatry

(ˌæntɪsaɪˈkaɪətrɪ)
n
(Psychiatry) an approach to mental disorders that makes use of concepts derived from existentialism, psychoanalysis, and sociological theory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Myths and misconceptions have been promoted in the lay public by fervent antipsychiatry groups, such as the Church of Scientology and MadNation, and more recently on the Web by Antipsychiatry.org.
We can expect similar elation from all antipsychiatry groups that do not practice in a biopsychosocial way and will misuse these ideas, which should never have escalated into unidimensional investigations, FDA involvement, and a narrow view of the use of SSRIs in children.
Soon after the actor's antipsychiatry riff, the American Psychiatric Association, the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, and the National Mental Health Association issued a joint statement calling his actions irresponsible.
(8) To overcome this dichotomy, Reich could have introduced a stronger comparative component in her work, emphasizing the parallels between the Western "antipsychiatry movement" and its Soviet counterpart.
All of the antipsychiatry system is trying to show us that antidepressants do not work in major depression.
Over two pages, he mentions the rate of Mental Health Act (MHA) committals, the relationship between psychiatric facilities and prisons (Penrose's Law), criminal incarceration, the proposed mental health units in prisons, antipsychiatry, the closure of psychiatric hospitals, the increase of coercive legislation and rates of Maori compulsory treatment and incarceration.
'"We Are Certain of Our Own Insanity': Antipsychiatry and the Gay Liberation Movement, 1968-1980." Journal of the History of Sexuality vol.
Debunking Antipsychiatry: Laing, Law and Largactil.
In addition, psychiatrists must also be prepared to patiently overcome widespread antipsychiatry sentiments about the nearly universal dependence on psychoactive drugs or the magnified "harmful" effects of hospitalisation or psychotherapy.
In psychiatry this process is called antipsychiatry, in the social arena it is referred to as consciousness-raising.
These misconceptions are further enforced by antipsychiatry groups and incorrect media information (P7 and P8).