antiquary


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an·ti·quar·y

 (ăn′tĭ-kwĕr′ē)
n. pl. an·ti·quar·ies
An antiquarian.

[Latin antīquārius, from antīquus, old; see antique.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antiquary

(ˈæntɪkwərɪ)
n, pl -quaries
(Antiques) a person who collects, deals in, or studies antiques, ancient works of art, or ancient times. Also called: antiquarian
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•ti•quar•y

(ˈæn tɪˌkwɛr i)

n., pl. -quar•ies.
1. an expert on or student of antiquities.
2. a collector of antiquities.
[1555–65; < Latin antīquārius=antīqu(us) ancient, old (see antique) + -ārius -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiquary - an expert or collector of antiquitiesantiquary - an expert or collector of antiquities
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
régiségbúvárrégiséggyűjtő

antiquary

[ˈæntɪkwəri] n
(= shopkeeper, dealer) → antiquaire m/f
(= student) → archéologue m/f
(= collector) → collectionneur/euse m/f d'objets anciens
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

antiquary

n (= collector)Antiquitätensammler(in) m(f); (= seller)Antiquitätenhändler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

antiquary

[ˈæntɪkwərɪ] nantiquario/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
On the contrary, I fear I shall incur the censure of presumption in placing the venerable name of Dr Jonas Dryasdust at the head of a publication, which the more grave antiquary will perhaps class with the idle novels and romances of the day.
It seems to be your opinion, that the very office of an antiquary, employed in grave, and, as the vulgar will sometimes allege, in toilsome and minute research, must be considered as incapacitating him from successfully compounding a tale of this sort.
As the earlier form of the letter is supposed to have been suggested by these pillars, so, it is thought by the great antiquary, its later was adopted as a simple and natural -- not to say touching -- means of keeping the calamity ever in the national memory.
I am Parson Tringham, the antiquary, of Stagfoot Lane.
He was an antiquary. That is, he loved old things, and he gathered together old books, coins, manuscripts and other articles, which are of interest because they help to make us understand the history of bygone days.
And the imperious Ginevra looked at each piece of furniture with the minute care of an antiquary examining a coin; she touched the silken hangings, and went over every article with the artless satisfaction of a bride in the treasures of her wedding outfit.
"At present I am nothing but an antiquary and an attorney.
Haddow may have been a dishonest lawyer, but he couldn't help being an honest antiquary. When he got on the track of the truth about the Holy Well he had to follow it up; he was not to be bamboozled with newspaper anecdotes about Mr.
It was a kind of satire on Nature: it was the scientific method, the geologic method; it deposited the history of the family in a stratified record; and the antiquary could dig through it and tell by the remains of each period what changes of diet the family had introduced successively for a hundred years.
Perchance some curious antiquary may light upon it there, and, with the assistance of Mr.
On Mount Sainte-Geneviève a sort of Job of the Middle Ages, for the space of thirty years, chanted the seven penitential psalms on a dunghill at the bottom of a cistern, beginning anew when he had finished, singing loudest at night, magna voce per umbras , and to-day, the antiquary fancies that he hears his voice as he enters the Rue du Puits-qui-parle--the street of the "Speaking Well."
A well-known poetical letter of the dramatist Francis Beaumont to Jonson celebrates the club meetings; and equally well known is a description given in the next generation from hearsay and inference by the antiquary Thomas Fuller: 'Many were the wit-combats betwixt Shakspere and Ben Jonson, which two I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war: Master Jonson, like the former, was built far higher in learning; solid, but slow in his performances; Shakespere, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.'