antiques


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an·tique

 (ăn-tēk′)
adj.
1. Belonging to, made in, or typical of an earlier period: antique furniture. See Synonyms at old.
2. Of or belonging to ancient times, especially of, from, or characteristic of ancient Greece or Rome.
3.
a. Relating to or dealing in antiques.
b. Having the appearance of an antique.
4. Old-fashioned; outdated: wore a suit of rather antique appearance.
n.
1. An object having special value because of its age, especially a domestic item or piece of furniture or handicraft esteemed for its artistry, beauty, or period of origin.
2. The style or manner of ancient times, especially that of ancient Greek or Roman art: an admirer of the antique.
v. an·tiqued, an·tiqu·ing, an·tiques
v.tr.
To give the appearance of an antique to: antiqued an oak chest.
v.intr.
To hunt or shop for antiques.

[French, from Latin antīquus; see ant- in Indo-European roots.]

an·tique′ly adv.
an·tique′ness n.

antiques

(ænˈtiːks)
pl n
(Antiques) (functioning as singular)
a. the business of selling antique objects
b. (as modifier): an antiques fair.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It is all very well," said the Monkey, "to laugh at my offspring, but you go into any gallery of antique sculpture and look at the statues and busts of the fellows that you begot yourself.
No more charming face, clear-cut like an antique gem, and delicate in colouring like the petal of a flower, had ever been set on, alas
I do not pretend to plead the immunities of my order so highly as this; but neither will I allow that the author of a modern antique romance is obliged to confine himself to the introduction of those manners only which can be proved to have absolutely existed in the times he is depicting, so that he restrain himself to such as are plausible and natural, and contain no obvious anachronism.
The rust on the ponderous iron-work of its oaken door looked more antique than anything else in the New World.
There lies antique beauty, not corpse-like even in death, but arrested in the complete contentment of its sensuous perfection: and here stands beauty in its breathing life, with the consciousness of Christian centuries in its bosom.
Huge columns carved out of single masses of marble, and inlaid from top to bottom with a hundred intricate figures wrought in costly verde antique; pulpits of the same rich materials, whose draperies hung down in many a pictured fold, the stony fabric counterfeiting the delicate work of the loom; the grand altar brilliant with polished facings and balustrades of oriental agate, jasper, verde antique, and other precious stones, whose names, even, we seldom hear-- and slabs of priceless lapis lazuli lavished every where as recklessly as if the church had owned a quarry of it.
As for those antique floor-cloth & still occasionally seen in the dwellings of the rabble - cloths of huge, sprawling, and radiating devises, stripe-interspersed, and glorious with all hues, among which no ground is intelligible-these are but the wicked invention of a race of time-servers and money-lovers - children of Baal and worshippers of Mammon - Benthams, who, to spare thought and economize fancy, first cruelly invented the Kaleidoscope, and then established joint-stock companies to twirl it by steam.
But in general I can tell you, Papa, that such a heroic spirit, the truly antique valor of the Russian army, which they- which it" (he corrected himself) "has shown or displayed in the battle of the twenty-sixth- there are no words worthy to do it justice
Descending from the cupola, I paused in the garret to observe the ponderous white-oak framework, so much more massive than the frames of modern houses, and thereby resembling an antique skeleton.
He could bring the drama of antique life before one out of the shadows--white figures against blue backgrounds.
Whether to admit Hercules among us or not, concerning this I long remained dubious: for though according to the Greek mythologies, that antique Crockett and Kit Carson --that brawny doer of rejoicing good deeds, was swallowed down and thrown up by a whale; still, whether that strictly makes a whaleman of him, that might be mooted.
The grave, precise, and courtly ceremony with which the thing is conducted, invests it with a sort of antique charm.