antirationalist

antirationalist

(ˌæntɪˈræʃənəlɪst)
adj
(Philosophy) opposed to rationalism
n
(Philosophy) a person opposed to rationalism
References in periodicals archive ?
Both of these political idioms share a common vocabulary, equality, and a common commitment to the political primacy of equality: for Marx, largely economic equality; for the antirationalist tradition, much more inclusive equality.
Lt Col Peter Faber, USAF, retired, argued that airpower theory and doctrine suffered inside a similar "prison house of language" during its development that mixed rationalist ideals, antirationalist thought, and army terminology.
As an "antirationalist," he explained that the world is too complex for any government planner to intentionally design and construct society's institutions.
"A place outside all places, outside of where." This was, according to French philosopher and Islamic scholar Henry Corbin, the eighth climate--a realm first described by Persian theosophist Shahab al-Din al-Suhrawardi in the twelfth century as being accessible only via "psychospiritual senses." Drawing inspiration from Suhrawardi's antirationalist geography, this year's Gwangju Biennale features projects by 101 artists, as well as lectures, discussions, and a publication accompanying the show.
For this reason and others, Hayek draws favorably from a different tradition, which he calls "antirationalist." Represented by prominent figures of the Scottish Enlightenment such as David Hume and Adam Smith, this tradition's approach to the question of reason and the state of nature is more plausible because it does not commit itself to the existence of an occult state of pure reason that is more primordial than what is plainly observable in the daily activity of the market economy.
the values of Apollo, far from forming the core of the forthcoming technocratic rationalist society that Mailer so feared, instead came to face serious challenges from a broad antirationalist cultural movement that Mailer represented well with many of his concerns, but which proved to be much larger than Mailer himself" (63).
(8) Nicholas Wolterstorff argues that trust is the most important category for Reid, making him not just antirationalist who contends that fundamental principles aren't rational, but also an antifoundationalist who maintains that truth consists not in the correspondence of ideas to reality, but in interpretation based on trust (2001, 213).
Attempts at a positive description of reality have either been left to the sciences, or, in the antiscientific and antirationalist strands of continental philosophy, descending from Heidegger, have been declared dangerous or deceptive altogether.
through colonial ethnographers, via the Harlem and Haitian renaissances, mixed with antirationalist European philosophy), the latter is a more engaged and engaging account of the content of this body of thought.
n = 5: INTENSITIES n = 7: CONTORTIONISTIC EXCRESCENCIES EPISCOPACIES REPOSITORIES n = 8: OVERINTENSITIES ANIMALIZATION INTERDISTRICT SAPONACEOUSNESS n = 9: ANIMALIZATIONS CANNIBALIZATION OLIGOPSONISTIC SIGMOIDOSCOPIES n = 10: ANTI RADICALISM(S) MARGINALIZATION n = 11: RADICALIZATIONS n = 5: n = 7: OMNISCIENCES ENREGISTERING SUPERSATURATES n = 8: ANTICAPITALIST ANTIRATIONALIST SILVICULTURIST(S) TACHYARRHYTHMIA n = 9: CHORDAMESODERMS ETHNOHISTORIANS SIGNALIZATIONS n = 10: RADICALIZATION n = 11: Of course these results are for a specific word list, and one that does not include any words longer than 15 letters.
If anything, Sand was the aberration: as Zeev Sternhell has extensively documented, the instinctual, primordial stirrings of the sentiments had formed the beating heart of the antirationalist and especially the nationalistic discourses of the counter-Enlightenment since the mid-eighteenth century (discourses that Sternhell associates with figures as diverse as Herder, Vico, Burke, and Carlyle, to which names we might add that of Pierre-Simon Ballanche, author in 1801 of the counterrevolutionary Du sentiment; 264-90).
Although discordant, Fondane's conception regarding the cohabitation of man and history (which is actually a kinship--and not a separation, despite the difference--between the intelligible and the sensible) adheres to this vision (antiplatonical and yet antirationalist) to such an extent that it could have subscribed with no hesitation to the next situation described by Levinas: "It would suffice to show the purely operator and provisory role of man in the development and the manifestation of an assembly of terms that make a system ...