antirealist

antirealist

(ˌæntɪˈrɪəlɪst) philosophy
adj
relating to antirealism
n
a person who denies the existence of an objective reality
References in periodicals archive ?
To an antirealist, neither a thoroughly teleological nor a thoroughly deontological interpretation of moral rules is the right one.
The instrumentalist Nature of Science (Antirealist) view represents scientific knowledge as a product of human imagination and creativity that allows for constructing arbitrary models to explain the physical phenomena (Munby, 1976).
Arguably reservation about an appeal to extra ingredients as the justifier of the distinction in question are entirely unfounded in the event that such "ingredients" are understood, non-substantially, as identity conditions and modal constraints.(23) The magical antirealist allows this, but also dismisses, as Sidelle puts it, "a mind-independent modal reality" (Sidelle 1989, 123).
Realist conceptions of truth are taking a beating from all sides in the academy these days: Mainstream analytic philosophers such as Michael Dummet and Crispin Wright are in the antirealist camp, and of course antirealism is a staple of postmodern writing inspired by Foucault, Deleuze, and Derrida.
She traces, for example, the mingling of realist and antirealist elements in the hybrid form of Lessing's The Golden Notebook, which together enact the desire to articulate Anna's life through narrative and, simultaneously, the impossibility of doing so in existing forms and binary conceptual structures.
He contrasts Rorty unfavorably with Wittgenstein in that Wittgenstein is not advancing metaphysical theses while Rorty supposedly advances a strong antirealist thesis, namely, that we cannot describe reality as it is in itself.
The whole project of the book is the cartography of "contour"--the characterization of dimensions in which different areas of our thought and discourse might vary and, by so varying, give point to "realist" and "antirealist" thoughts about them.
The playwright's antirealist invocation of ghosts, vampires, and evil spirits helped usher in Expressionist drama.
An argument from scientific practice on the antirealist side has recently been presented by Morrison [1990].(1) Following Cartwright [1983], she notes that scientists routinely employ multiple and incompatible theories in making empirical predictions.
This concern stems from an antirealist position about actions (and perhaps events more generally).(9) A good working hypothesis is that if you scratch a skeptic about the utility of a metaphysical analysis you will find a skeptic about the truth of that metaphysical analysis.
A well-known pronouncement by Stanley Fish is strikingly antirealist:
Hints came from his familiarity with the attempts of avant-garde poets to break free of mimetic constraints, from his reading in the fabulous literature of earlier times, from his acquaintance with the work of such a 19th-century antirealist as <IR> AMBROSE BIERCE </IR> , and from his awareness of the fountains of cultural diversity in Latin America that gave rise to <IR> MAGICAL REALISM </IR> .