antirealist

antirealist

(ˌæntɪˈrɪəlɪst) philosophy
adj
relating to antirealism
n
a person who denies the existence of an objective reality
References in periodicals archive ?
By contrast, those who reject the existence of those types of properties and facts are antirealist about them.
Following a logistical explication of metaphysics, Quine can be cast as an ideological antirealist about modality.
The antirealist boom novel became a form hyper aware and reflective of its purposeful fictional condition in ways that remained utterly absent in Ribeyro's short stories, whose forthright techne simply does not permit such a layered level of self-reflexivity.
The latter trades positivism's naive realism for an antirealist nominalism.
Thus, in the West the journal Mundo Nuevo upheld Borges as "the archetypical antirealist," who could help "argue against socialist realism in the Soviet Union" (Dawes 28); whereas in the USSR, Borges belonged to the authors that "had rarely been published" (Ryzhalc 4).
The shift from Victorianism to modernism has commonly been ascribed to the employment of antirealist narrative schemes by late-Victorian novelists.
It is worth to note that artefactualists borrow the idea of pretense from antirealist theories which deny the existence of fictional characters.
2) In the introduction to his book, Traumatic Realism: The Demands of Holocaust Representation, Rothberg offers a concise and important summary of two approaches within Holocaust Studies that have dominated the discourse: realist and antirealist (3).
Anias Mutekwa analyses Marechera's self-proclaimed 'intellectual anarchism' in Mindblast through Baudrillard's antirealist theory of simulation, giving a sophisticated reading of Marechera's short plays that have, so far, been neglected by critics.
There is a strong antirealist current within creativity research (in accordance with the general tendency in the human sciences over the last decades), with Csikzentmihalyi and Gardner as some of the more well-known proponents of this stance (Feldman, Csikszentmihalyi, & Gardner, 1994).
Accordingly, Machen's novel might be read as an antirealist, idealist work of horror in the sense that Thomas Ligotti describes it in his collection of notes and aphorisms, 'We Can Hide from Horror Only in the Heart of Horror' (1994).
But, throughout the film, there is also a persistent undercurrent that provides a kind of antirealist counterpoint.