antiregulatory

antiregulatory

(ˌæntɪˌrɛɡjʊˈleɪtərɪ)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to regulation
References in periodicals archive ?
EPA, prominently tout their antiregulatory rationales, sometimes including extensive language about the harms of regulation and agency power.
immunity doctrine have been aligned with the antiregulatory Chicago
She takes the New Deal revolution as the big bang, which establishes the framework from which all subsequent legal analysis must proceed: "[W]e are seeing a resurgence of the antiregulatory and antigovernment forces that lost the battle of the New Deal." (7) She complains that accepting the constitutional critique of the administrative state "would require a reformation of the constitutional order that has governed for the last eighty years." (8) Any deviation from post-1930s institutional or intellectual developments is evidently suspect, and even sinister.
(265) anti-public-sector bias, (266) or antiregulatory effects.
Unfortunately, the EPA is now under a different and admittedly antiregulatory administration.
Convened for the express purpose of helping agencies to carry out their statutory mandates, these bodies often found themselves on the front line of political combat, whether for having over-read the evidence in favor of regulation or, less frequently, for granting too much latitude to industry's antiregulatory claims.
The IQA has proved contentious, with critics arguing that it is unnecessary, given preexisting agency mechanisms to guarantee information quality, and has been abused by industry to serve antiregulatory goals.
Outside of the national security area, moreover, this Article has argued that FOIA contributes more significantly to other ecologies of transparency--regressive, antiregulatory ecologies that do meaningful damage to the administrative state and the prospects for effective governance.
(164) Proponents of formal CBA tout its benefits for promoting transparency and rationality in agency decision making, (165) while critics have raised concerns about antiregulatory bias, lack of sufficient attention to distributional effects, and the feasibility of "pricing the priceless." (166) Yet even Franklin's informal, qualitative comparison of pros and cons might be an improvement over the current practice of landmarks commissions, to the extent that they ignore costs altogether.