antiretroviral therapy


Also found in: Acronyms.

antiretroviral therapy

n. Abbr. ART
1. The use of antiretroviral medications to suppress and limit the progression of HIV.
2. See highly active antiretroviral therapy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Health experts in the United States and across the world now recommend that people start antiretroviral therapy as soon as they test positive for HIV.
They then initiated daily antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 96-weeks, during acute infection to suppress the virus to below detectable levels in the monkey's blood.
This study highlights that oral lesions especially oral candidiasis are decreased after antiretroviral therapy while some lesions especially oral pigmentation has been significantly increased which may be due to the side effects of this therapy.
General practice has been to defer antiretroviral therapy until CD4+ counts decline to a certain threshold level--a level that has changed over time and that varies across different treatment guidelines Such deferral was prompted by concerns that early treatment would expose patients to more of the adverse effects of antiretrovirals--particularly that today's aging HIV-positive population would have more exposure to the detrimental effects on cardiovascular and renal health.
Around 35 million people are living with HIV and more than two million start antiretroviral therapy each year.
In all study areas, participants with positive test results could go to a study clinic to have their results confirmed and begin antiretroviral therapy if eligible (i.e., if their CD4 cell count was lower than 350 cells/[mm.sup.3], they were in clinical stage 3 or 4, or they were pregnant or breastfeeding).
According to the researchers from University of North Carolina and NIH, such a targeted poison could complement antiretroviral therapy, which dramatically reduces the replication of HIV in infected cells but does not eliminate them.
As of 2012, 9.7 million people in low- and middle-income countries were on antiretroviral therapy, with the biggest increase recorded in 2012.
"It is our moral and scientific obligation to reach as many people as we can with antiretroviral therapy" said Michel Sidibe, Executive Director of UNAIDS in Geneva on Sunday.
The safety and efficacy of Fulyzaq were established in a clinical trial of 374 HIV-positive patients on stable antiretroviral therapy with a history of diarrhea lasting one month or longer.
WHO guidelines issued in 2009 recommended antiretroviral therapy for people with a CD4 cell count below 350 cells/m[m.sup.3] and for all HIV-positive individuals with TB.