antiromantic

antiromantic

(ˌæntɪrəʊˈmæntɪk)
adj
opposed to romanticism
n
a person opposed to romanticism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the opposite of the 'romantic ruin' because the buildings don't fall into ruin after they are built but rather rise into ruin before they are built." Maybe he was traveling to neither the future nor the past: "This antiromantic mise-en-scene suggests," he writes, "the discredited idea of time."
Crehan's work of course does have the wherewithal to locate Gramsci's "antiromantic" refusal to see "common sense" in solely praiseworthy terms.
The middle classes wrote for the masses with the intention of improving their lives and circumstances, providing didactic, antiromantic short stories and biographies which bore the message of self-education and self-improvement.
The Don Juan story has been spun out into dozens, perhaps hundreds, of different versions over the past four centuries, pressed into the service of many different orbits of concern--there is Don Juan the romantic, Don Juan the antiromantic, Don Juan the existentialist, Don Juan the social-Darwinist, Don Juan the feminist even, and so forth.
To deploy Nixon's own antiromantic, antipastoral terminology, the Bruneaus, Petitjeans, Alexanders, and Holcombes belong to the category of "ecosystem people": "those hundreds of millions who depend for their livelihood on modest resource catchment areas" (22).
Enacting this antiromantic stance, Scalapino's language often suppresses affect and remains provocatively flat.
(2) Beyond this, however, Smithyman noticed that within the 'romantic strain' of New Zealand poetry an "antiromantic writing, an inverse romanticism which [...] is the other side of the romantic medal' existed (italics in the original; p.
Mendelson does not reduce Auden to an antiRomantic jester.
Unsettling, as it does, both the values and the function of the imperial romance within British society, at such moments the narrator of Outcast exposes itself as a kind of genric and ideological contradiction--an antiromantic narrator telling a romantic tale.
Stephen Huebner opens the Volume with a creatively intertextual essay on Ravel and the notion of classicism, which he treats as a network of antiromantic concepts linked closely with poets whom Ravel admired or who were part of his artistic circle.
For newcomers, this 'antiromantic comedy' is based around a couple in their mid-20s who spend most of their time in bed at their untidy bedsit.
(9) It is an openly failed antiromantic experiment, for Keats registers the futility of the ironic in this text just as he does the authentic.