antiroyalist

antiroyalist

(ˌæntɪˈrɔɪəlɪst)
adj
opposed to the monarchy
n
a person opposed to the monarchy
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm neither royalist or antiroyalist but do see the monetary value of having them.
Some antiroyalist employers are taking full advantage of the confusion between the phrase "Bank Holiday" and the phrase "Public Holiday" and what it might say or not say in your contract of employment, if you are lucky enough to have been given one.
Even in the intransigently antiroyalist climate of the early republic, a consideration of how to style Washington hinted at the deep attachment to monarchy.
In Absalom and Achitophel, as well as in The Medal (both published in 1682), Dryden attacks the antiroyalist Whigs who wanted to exclude the Catholic James, brother and legitimate successor of Charles II, from the royal succession in favor of the Protestant Duke of Monmouth, Charles II's illegitimate son.
Some writers in the ECHO have developed an increasingly antiRoyalist tendency in recent years.
Although there was a time when antiroyalist historians claimed that the English had inherited the jury trial directly from the Romans through the Anglo-Saxons, historians now generally agree that that was not the case, and that there were no jury trials in England before William the Conqueror brought them with him as a royal institution.
Although a number of fringe, antiroyalist groups have been attemptinq to stop the project, it is scheduled to begin in 2010.
In terms lifted from the beginning of Virgil's Aeneid, he facetiously commiserated with Moll Cutpurse and the female petitioners of the London mob who used to be dismissed disparagingly as fishwives from Billingsgate (as prostitutes) in antiroyalist tracts:
59) The Polish democratic and libertarian constitutional ideas it exported helped to fuel the antiroyalist opposition movement in the decades leading up to the civil war of 1642.
In case there's an antiroyalist coup, they say, the United States would need seventy-two hours to marshal its full military might to reverse the coup.
3) In other words, what Wasserman understands as the deep structure of the poem-concord and balance--I regard as the alluring and deceptive veneer of a work whose depth is a highly partisan act, a calculated attempt to disenfranchise Denham's antiroyalist enemies by constructing a poetic and political landscape in which they have no voice.
During the early seventeenth century, its inhabitants were frequently cited for Puritan activity, and, during the revolution, their sentiments were predominantly antiroyalist (Victoria History [note 13], 61-62).