antisegregation

antisegregation

(ˌæntɪˌsɛɡrɪˈɡeɪʃən)
adj
(Sociology) opposed to or acting against segregration
References in periodicals archive ?
Yeah number 7 (December 1963) takes "A Look at the White Problem," with material ranging from pre-Civil War racial caricature to excerpts from The Nigble Papers, a satirical antisegregation newsletter put out by "moderate" white students at the University of Mississippi in 1956, to the Nation of Islam journal Muhammad Speaks and publications from the Information Service of South Africa.
This result is similar to the result of our calculations for Mo (210) surface where we also see an essentially zero segregation energy with a slight tendency towards antisegregation (see Figure 2).
Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas in 1954 (itself the result of a number of other antisegregation legislative victories), to the success of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1956, to the passage of a weak Civil Rights Act in 1957, initially designed to ensure voting rights and protect desegregation efforts, but according to Von Eschen, Marable, and Nikhil Pal Singh, these advances were outweighed by the destruction of the broad coalition of radical black scholars and activists from the prewar period.
Kahn writes about how citizens from the poor inner neighbourhoods gain a sense of community empowerment when they organize to demand stop signs for the protection of their children, using that example as a means to jump into a description of the Southern US Civil Rights movement, a short history of abolitionism, the Underground Railroad, the NAACP, the antisegregation movement, and the fight against apartheid in South Africa.
She proposes that Southern authors may have played a part in the broader shift by the end of the 30s toward antisegregation and the staging of more productive and progressive "intersections among southern, national, and global temporalities" (13) in the 40s.
The novel's antislavery and antisegregation overtones are also important.
Most countries now have extensive antisegregation laws.
(133) "[W]hile there is no clear evidence that FDR nominated jurists with a specific desire to advance African American rights, his nominees' adherence to rights-centered liberalism combined with their devotion to defer to the executive branch ensured that the NAACP would find fertile ground to lay its antisegregation precedential seeds...." (134) Although helping blacks was not FDR's goal, the Justices drawn from the faction of the Democratic Party likely to support the President's actual objectives were also--at that time--more likely to oppose Jim Crow than the average white.
New York state senator Ruben Diaz and the Liberty Counsel, a conservative legal group, filed a lawsuit August 13 charging that the school violates antisegregation laws.
By the 1950s, when the antisegregation strategy that eventually led to Brown coalesced, they had succeeded in writing class out of their story.