antisense

(redirected from antisense DNA)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

an·ti·sense

 (ăn′tē-sĕns′, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Of or relating to a nucleotide sequence that is complementary to a sequence of messenger RNA. When antisense DNA or RNA is added to a cell, it binds to a specific messenger RNA molecule and inactivates it.

an•ti•sense

(ˌæn tiˈsɛns, ˌæn taɪ-)
adj.
of or pertaining to a gene that is derived from RNA or complementary DNA, is inserted in reverse orientation into a strand of DNA, and is used in genetic engineering to regulate genetic expression of a trait.
[1985–90]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 29, 2016-Bio-Path Holdings to investigate DNAbilize antisense DNA technology for brain cancer immunotherapy in partnership with Thomas Jefferson University
M2 PHARMA-June 29, 2016-Bio-Path Holdings to investigate DNAbilize antisense DNA technology for brain cancer immunotherapy in partnership with Thomas Jefferson University
I briefly explained the meanings of sense and antisense DNA strands, genetic code, codon and anticodon, exon and intron, cap and tail on mRNA, and the codon chart for amino acids.
The further analysis of 1100 CHD patients and 180 periodontitis patients showed that the genetic risk variant is located in a genetic region that codes for an antisense DNA called ANRIL and that it is identical for both diseases.
Each individual nucleotide of both the sense and antisense DNA strands was interrogated with 4 25mer probes that differed only with respect to the central position (A, C, G, and T).
To test this theory, researchers used antisense DNA technology to reduce the expression of several cyclin genes, including cyclin D1.
Lynx was spun out front Applied Biosystems in 1992 to develop drugs based on antisense DNA research.
The field of antisense DNA research involves taking a gene and scrambling its genetic code so that it literally no longer makes "sense" -- that is, once reinserted into the genome, it can no longer code for a normal product, an expressed protein of some sort.