antisentimental

antisentimental

(ˌæntɪˌsɛntɪˈmɛntəl)
adj
(of a piece of art or literature) deliberately unsentimental
References in periodicals archive ?
esta tecnica cubista se asienta en una postura antisentimental que niega cualquier posible asociacion con el romanticismo.
Poesia antidescriptiva, antisentimental, antimetrica.
They [were] antilyrical, antisentimental, antitraditionalist" (Ungureanu, "Richard Wagner" 5).
In this antisentimental image, fantasies of the romantic maternal collide with the historical reality of African American women's manual labor.
Such romantic underpinnings shimmer through much of Adams's work, making his affiliation with the antisublime, antisentimental ethos of the legendary 1975 "New Topographies" exhibition (in which he was included) less and less convincing.
Los quijotescos personajes femeninos son el contrapunto necesario del realismo antisentimental de Rufus que solo existe en funcion de la actitud de las mujeres sonadoras, ellas son su otro, son lo que el recalca, lo que lo atrae y, a la vez, lo que el rechaza.
Clara Tuite categorizes Sense and Sensibility as "an antisentimental novel" (56) that "parod[ies] .
In his good looks, his ability to charm almost every woman he meets--Laura, her confidante Signora Sporza, and the cold-hearted courtesan Nerina are the main exceptions--and his calculated use of those attributes to serve entirely his immediate pleasure, Zeluco anticipates what Claudia Johnson describes as the 'seductive potency' of 'Montoni's ferociously antisentimental manhood'.
30) Kane may be alluding to Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus who, after discovering the depth of his family's victimization, responds inexplicably by laughing, a fiercely antisentimental response that lays the groundwork for revenge served cool.
Since the 1960s, critics have increasingly read the novel as antisentimental, based on their ironic interpretation of the vicar.
Le voyant, tour a tour revolutionnaire ("Chant de guerre parisien"), grossier, anticlerical ("Accroupissement"), antisentimental ("Mes Petites amoureuses") continue, en effet, a rimer.
1792) as an antisentimental parody: "I wish to argue in what follows that the sentimental parody of Catherine involves a panic-stricken, apotropaic representation of the threat of female homoeroticism represented by the contemporary discourses and conventions of sentiment" (33).