antisex

antisex

(ˌæntɪˈsɛks)
adj
opposed to human sexual activity
References in periodicals archive ?
"I can't go with her now because she has an underlying bad motive, she wants to eat," she wryly observes, "and what I feel for her is complete sex." How do we reconcile this self-critical, principled, desirous Andrea with the antisex villain invoked in third-wave defenses of sexual empowerment--the feminist prerogative to squeeze pleasure from the status quo?
Evans challenges the stereotyping of the women's liberation movement as white, middle class, and antisex, arguing that this is a myth fostered by academic theory, the movement's opponents, and the mistaken notion that women's liberation rejected its New Left roots.
As contraceptives became widely available in the 1960s, a number of courageous and creative Catholic women began to question their tradition's antisex teachings.
I have the impression of hearing today an 'antisex' grumbling (I'm not a prophet, at most a diagnostician), as if a thorough effort were being made to shake this great 'sexography' which makes us decipher sex as the universal secret.").
(466) Professor Katherine Franke has referred to the sexual domination theory as "anti-sex." (467) She argues that it "conflates sex and sexism." (468) The antisex position resonates with cultural conservatives and those who view all sex in the workplace as a threat to efficiency.
I have also used my column as a platform for sex-positive intervention, as a way to push against antipornography, antiprostitution, and antisex work advocates who are not shy about bending facts and reality to suit their purposes.
(15) For example, Naomi Wolf refers to second-wave feminism as "victim feminism" and portrays it as "sexually judgmental, even antisexual," "judgmental of other women's sexuality and appearance," and "self-righteous." (16) In response to this stereotypical characterization, some third-wave feminists claim to be "less rigid and judgmental than their mothers' generation, which they often represent as antimale, antisex, antifemininity and antifun," depicting their version of feminism as more inclusive and racially diverse than the second-wave.
And young women don't want to be antisex, obviously, and they sure don't want potential lovers to see them as anti-sex.
In the context of IP, even though patent, copyright, and trademark laws have all moved away from the days of denying wholesale protection for objects like sex toys and works and marks that address sexual matter, underlying antisex or sex-normative judgments continue to percolate up, particularly in copyfight and trademark laws.
Sommers's critique that the play makes women seem "desperate and pathetic" is echoed by Camille Paglia's rant against "the hysterical desperation of aging women" and "bourgeois repression." Here, Sommers's antisex position (to use the terms of the '80s feminist debate) lines up with Paglia's self-designated "prosex" stance, Paglia claiming not squeamishness about the evocation of sex per se but the specter of radical feminism's (she calls Ensler "the new Andrea Dworkin, minus Medusa hair and rumpled farm overalls") female victimization and male blaming.
Although the military waged an antisex campaign, every military base had prophylactic stations that dispensed condoms and preventive chemical treatments for venereal disease.