antisexist

antisexist

(ˌæntɪˈsɛksɪst)
n
a person opposed to sexism
adj
opposed to sexism
References in periodicals archive ?
This post-capitalist pedagogy must also take an anti-racist and antisexist position as one of its central purposes--as the Party currently does.
women of color emerged not just from an antisexist critique of nationalist movements or an antiracist critique of women's liberation, but from the kinds of coalitions between disparate groups of women of color that came together under the banner of Third World Solidarity.
In this way--or by combining the temporal with the spatial aspects of in-betweenness--we are able to recognize that humour can be both sexist and antisexist (or that sexism and antisexism are constitutive outsides) and can avoid the strategy that Billig adopts by accentuating the negative rather than the positive or that Critchley adopts by reconstructing a hierarchical duality of humour and jokes, smiling and laughter.
From the perspective of higher education, the big problem with political correctness as "diversity" is less trendy dogmatism about what being antisexist, antiracist, and so forth requires than of the limiting of education to a dogmatic inculcation of an extremely individualistic view of justice.
For example, Ogunyemi emphasizes the idea of unity between Black men and women (3) Like Walker, Ogunyemi believes that Black men cannot have black women's experiences but they can support African American women by advocating anti-racist and antisexist philosophies in their intellectual and political work.
With the World March of Women, feminists across Canada are fighting to bring back antisexist and anti-heterosexist sexed in the classrooms.
For this project, the defining characteristics of socialist feminist women's studies include antisexist, anticapitalist, anti-imperialist, and antiracist ideology; egalitarian pedagogical practices; and attempts to transform university structures as well as expand new areas of intellectual inquiry with the ultimate goal of creating a society of economic as well as gender justice in the United States.
And finally, never mind the deep irony of reformers arguing the importance of biological differences for antiracist and antisexist ends, given that in the not-so-distant past the very same types of claims were used in precisely the opposite way--to argue for the superiority of white men.
As I hope my readings of these novels suggest, social change can occur not by jettisoning but by mobilizing identity, by examining how and when passers' unique position affords insight into structures of injustice and inequity: "The discourse of antisexist and antiracist identity-based liberation movements has by and large not demanded a dissolution of the categories, but has demanded instead a radical transformation of the way they are interpreted and valued, how their relation to other categories is understood, and how they relate to historical events and social systems is accounted for" (286).
A single semester is far too short of a time to expect that students can silence the powerful ideologies of whiteness, color blindness, individuality, and meritocracy and become committed and anti-racist, antisexist allies, who have internalized such attributes as flexibility, respect, and empathy (see Tilford).