antisocialist

antisocialist

(ˌæntɪˈsəʊʃəlɪst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics a person opposed to socialism
2. a person averse to sociality
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics opposed to socialism
References in periodicals archive ?
The worst part is that the party rules are issued in the broadest terms possible, such as 'adventurism,' 'parasitism,' 'antisocialist conduct' and 'deviationism.' Nikita Khrushchev was deposed for 'adventurism' for having installed nuclear missiles in Cuba without the sanction of the Politburo.
It is worth noting that the main line of defense, once again mimicking that of Ukrainian dissidents, was that Dziuba was falsely accused of being antisocialist, because "we see that he has faith in the sacred values of communism." (32)
(We prefer "pro-capitalist nativism" over the more common "populism" because populism appears on both the left and the right of the political spectrum while there can be no doubt that the nationalist, antisocialist movements to which we refer are on the right.
It reads as a bright undergraduate's thesis, expanded for an English-language market eager to take credit for China's antisocialist present.
The regime sees markets as a hotbed of capitalistic and antisocialist crime.
"'A Voice from China': Ha Jin and the Cultural Politics of Antisocialist Realism." In Foreign Accents: Chinese American Verse from Exclusion to Postethnicity, 109-42.
On his political ideology: "I'm antisocialist. I hate socialism, it's a lot of nonsense.
He had a rather authoritarian, antisocialist vision of democracy in Germany, and he was willing to put the press to the use of state power and of conservative politics.
In the previews, the Yiddish press was divided between those who liked it and those from the antisocialist Yiddish press, who did not.
Without doubt, in the West Riding there existed a strong element for which he could find no better word than antisocialist pacifism."
Ryan then gives the reasons for said opposition and weakly concludes by saying that the Church "cannot be blamed for opposing that kind of a movement." But Ryan then points out that "particular churchmen" (emphasis his), and not the Church as a whole, have been opposed to the revolutions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, thus distancing himself, and the Church by extension, from the antisocialist and anticommunist encyclicals issued beginning with Pius IX.