antisyzygy

antisyzygy

(ˌæntɪˈsɪzɪdʒɪ)
n
the joining together of opposites
References in periodicals archive ?
MacDiarmid's "caricatural poiesis" is based in part on the idea of "Caledonian antisyzygy," a capacity to maintain multiple perspectives, specifically the capacity for exacting detail joined to a pleasure in excess, in the fantastic and "topsy-turvy.
En Modernism and Nationalism, Margery Palmer McCulloch recoge de manera exhaustiva la heterogeneidad de un periodo en el que, entre otros conflictos, se intentaban conciliar las contradicciones del Caledonian Antisyzygy, definidas en 1919 por Gregory Smith como "the contrasts which the Scot shows at every turn, in his political and ecclesiastical history, in his polemical restlessness, in his adaptability" (Palmer McCulloch 2004: 6).
Now, if we consider Gregory Smith's--and then Hugh MacDiarmid's--"Caledonian Antisyzygy," the overmentioned bipolar identity of the Scots, are you with authors, like Tom Nairn (1992: 6) in reference to the 1979 referendum, who see this as a recurring motto for those who try to justify the political inmobilisation of an internally-colonised people?