antiurban

antiurban

(ˌæntɪˈɜːbən)
adj
(Human Geography) opposed to the urban environment or urban life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Film maker Jane Treays spent a year with the people who work on Country Life, the mag that is unashamedly antiurban. As well as capturing grouse moors, manor houses, winding lanes and silvery rivers, she meets Harry and his ratting terriers, right, and uncovers who the mag thinks are Gentleman Of The Year and Britain's Naughtiest Dog.
Indeed, an antiurban attitude is ingrained in the American psyche.
It was an antiurban move, one that allowed him to experience unmediated contact with a different way of life.
Correcting poor analysis / Some of the antiurban arguments fail because they do not think in per-capita terms.
Ironically, then, the short-term consequences of Lindsay's initiative illustrate some of the innate contradictions of laissez-faire urban restructuring: while the Major's Office of Film was aimed at replacing New York City's diminishing tax base with revenues from movie production, the proliferation of antiurban films may instead have accelerated 'white flight' and diminished the tax base further.
Serious social tensions are some of the effects of the provocations as Encyclopaedia 2009, church on capital's Ottoman castle, antiurban project "Skopje 2014", Vevchani 2012 etc.
Subsidies for freeways and mortgages encouraged mass suburbanization, a process further fueled by procrustean zoning and antiurban rhetoric.
On the other, his antiurban fantasies foreshadowed the auto-based sprawl that threatens the planet itself as a viable organism.
A contradictory geographical inheritance--the native, undeveloped, and antiurban spirit of the US landscape on one hand and the physical, familial connections between US citizens and their ancestors from the "old country" on the other--makes for a modern Americanism that is both ungrounded and self-eroding.
Strangely, he seems to share the sense of fear and evil at "exploiting" nature he reads in Chaucer, Langland, and the Flemish masters, for this chapter ends with a condemnation of Venice and L.A., cities dedicated respectively to "commerce, luxury, slick finance, and living on its wits" and "infinite possibility, hybridity, and waste," where nature is improved upon "through a million" cosmetic surgeries, deserts reclaimed to freeways through an "ecology of evil" and "dreams are made and beamed to the world" (124), an antiurban crescendo worthy of a medieval preacher's rant.
How to resolve the antiurban bias in our national character with the need to sustain a vital city environment?