antivivisection


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antivivisection

(ˌæntɪˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃən)
adj
(Zoology) opposed to the act or practice or performing experiments on living animals, involving cutting into or dissecting the body
Translations

antivivisection

[ˈæntɪˌvɪvɪˈsekʃən]
A. Nantiviviseccionismo m
B. CPD antivivisection movement Nmovimiento m antiviviseccionista
References in periodicals archive ?
National Antivivisection Society, Chicago, United States (2016).
The National AntiVivisection Society (NAVS) describe the day as an "international day of commemoration" for animals in laboratories.
For example, besides the role of women, legal persecutions, educational standards, professionalization, and antivivisection and antivaccination issues, it would have been equally helpful if Cayleff had emphasized more the actual physician/patient relationship, the medical dialogue, the understanding of the role of the placebo effect, and the preferred treatments that evolved over time.
It is based on a stark human-animal dualism that was contested by philosophers even as it was being proposed, and it seems to undercut the motivation of animal care embodied in antivivisection legislation.
Anti-French Discourse in the Nineteenth-century British Antivivisection Movement
SO, the Antivivisection Coalition would like Newcastle University to listen to the public.
Kreilkamp's reading of Wuthering Heights and domestic pet-keeping in relation to the rise of British anti-cruelty and antivivisection movements proposes that the biopolitical aim of the novel form is ultimately "to place the reader herself on the operating table," that is, to make readers sympathetically feel the unbearable pain of animal vivisection (106).
THE number of animals being used in scientific experiments surged to more than 50,000 in Wales last year, sparking condemnation from antivivisection campaigners.
The narrator's derisory epithet for Bradshaw, "the priest of science" (92), echoes the term "the new priesthood" commonly deployed by Victorian antivivisection feminists to denounce experimental physiologists for their cruelty toward animals and other living subjects.
Some of his 'Frankenstein-type' experiments caused rage with antivivisection supporters who demonstrated outside the Rockefeller Institute, calling for legislation to be passed to halt experiments on animals (Cusimano et al 1984).
(39) Throughout the period in which Rossetti was composing and publishing "Goblin Market" she had resumed her friendships with the Langham Place feminists, including Barbara Bodichon; she also began ministering to the needs of the inmates at Highgate; supporting antivivisection efforts, and counting among her acquaintances the organizers of a Factory Girls' Club.
Beginning in the 1890s, she and her husband, Herbert Ward, aligned themselves with the antivivisection movement in Massachusetts, then a leading center of animal rights activism.