antivivisectionist


Also found in: Medical.
Related to antivivisectionist: vivisecting

antivivisectionist

(ˈæntɪˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃənɪst)
n
a person who is opposed to vivisection
Translations

antivivisectionist

[ˈæntɪˌvɪvɪˈsekʃənɪst] Nantiviviseccionista mf

antivivisectionist

[ˈæntɪˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃnɪst] nantivivisezionista m/f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Current pro- and antivivisectionist arguments and campaigns are motored by the rhetorical possibilities afforded by the likeness / difference dilemma, obviating the matter that, as Huggan and Tiffin contend, it is not so much the animals themselves that pose a problem for postcolonial civilizations, but rather our representation of them.
He defends his ethics in the essays 'The Greatest Happiness Principle' (1991); 'Metaphysics, Physicalism, and Animal Rights' (1983); and 'Vivisection, Morals, Medicine: Commentary from and Antivivisectionist Philosopher' (1983).
(3) These carefully rehearsed patterns of imagery not only elevate the animals involved in experiments into the pantheon of martyrs; they also simultaneously reinscribe the antivivisectionist claim that repeated exposure to this practice desensitized the participant, normalized rather than stigmatized the practice of inflicting pain on living beings.
Imitating the aristocracy of old, the middle class began to promenade their dogs along the boulevards, while affording their idle strutting canine companions with an ambulance service, cemetery, and an advocate of their own, the newly created Antivivisectionist Society.
(1) As with the eclectic language of the social critical tradition employed by other antivivisectionist writers, The Hunting of the Snark brings a variety of discourses and perspectives to bear on the allegedly disinterested disciplines in the burgeoning life sciences.
Pasteur himself endorsed this approach, but the main reason for its adoption was the fear of opposition to any clinic or laboratory from the powerful antivivisectionist lobby
Wells's concerns have much in common with recent feminist critiques of science, and also connect The Island of Doctor Moreau with the feminist and antivivisectionist positions prevalent at the time he was writing.
While many remember him chiefly as a dramatist, others might think of him in one of his many other roles: vegetarian, nonsmoker, total abstainer (not even tea; he drank carrot juice and water only), and antivivisectionist. He also was a staunch advocate for language reform, socialism, and Wagner.
Although most biomedical scientists will recognize the usefulness of such animal studies, several radical activist groups have started an antivivisectionist movement and even threatened and vandalized many biomedical research laboratories using animals.
She actively supported the women's suffrage movement and was an outspoken antivivisectionist.
Consider these impassioned thinkers: Diotima, who taught Socrates about love in Plato's Symposium; St Teresa of Avila; Frances Power Cobbe, the Victorian philosopher, feminist, and antivivisectionist crusader; Simone de Beauvoir; Rachel Carson; Nobel Prizewinning plant geneticist Barbara McClintock; and contemporary radical feminist philosophers Carol J.
Lederer, ever mindful of the race, class, and gender politics that suffused the struggles, explores the institutional poker game played out between the antivivisectionist organizations and the AMA.