antrum


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an·trum

 (ăn′trəm)
n. pl. an·tra (-trə)
1. A cavity or chamber, especially one in a bone.
2. Either of the sinuses in the bones of the upper jaw, opening into the nasal cavity.

[Late Latin, cavity in the body, from Latin, cave, from Greek antron.]

an′tral adj.

antrum

(ˈæntrəm)
n, pl -tra (-trə)
(Anatomy) anatomy a natural cavity, hollow, or sinus, esp in a bone
[C14: from Latin: cave, from Greek antron]
ˈantral adj

an•trum

(ˈæn trəm)

n., pl. -tra (-trə).
a cavity in a body organ, esp. a bony sinus.
[1720–30; < New Latin; Latin: cave < Greek ántron]
an′tral, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antrum - a natural cavity or hollow in a boneantrum - a natural cavity or hollow in a bone
bodily cavity, cavum, cavity - (anatomy) a natural hollow or sinus within the body
Translations

an·trum

n. antro, cavidad o cámara casi cerrada;
auris ___cavidad del oído;
cardiaum ______ cardial;
follicular ______ folicular;
mastoid ______ mastoideo;
maxillary ______ maxilar o seno maxilar;
pyloricum ______ pilórico;
tympanic ______ timpánico.
References in classic literature ?
Nam simul expletus dapibus, vinoque sepultus Cervicem inflexam posuit, jacuitque per antrum Immensus, saniem eructans, ac frusta cruenta Per somnum commixta mero.
And those that held Phylace and the flowery meadows of Pyrasus, sanctuary of Ceres; Iton, the mother of sheep; Antrum upon the sea, and Pteleum that lies upon the grass lands.
Endoscopic evaluation showed that 177 (50.1%) of the polyps were located in the antrum, 71 (20.1%) in the corpus, 43 (12.2%) in the fundus, 27 (7.6%) in the cardia, 14 (4%) in multiple areas of the stomach, and 21 (5.9%) were located either in the distal esophagus or the duodenum.
22); antrum weakly developed in the female genitalia (Fig.
* Subsites: (a) Mesotympanum, (b) Protympanum, (c) Hypotympanum, (d) Retrotympanum, (e) Antrum and (f) Mastoid.
Tenders are invited for Supply of Forcep Ent Fess Antrum Grasping Forcep.
The GAWs is a resident mucosa ring in the distal stomach (gastric antrum), which may cause gastric-outlet obstruction.
pylori infection was the histology based on bioptic samples taken in antrum during gastroscopy.1 This latter point raises a crucial criticism.
In conventional group, tube entry into the antrum was confirmed if tram-track signs were observed in the cross-section or the longitudinal section.
Perhaps surprisingly, though, the biggest bang for H.pylori treatment is seen in the antrum of the stomach, not in the corpus.
Malignancies involving the maxillary antrum alone were the commonest in the sinonasal region (Table 2).