aphasia


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aphasia

inability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain
Not to be confused with:
aphagia – difficulty or pain in swallowing

a·pha·sia

 (ə-fā′zhə)
n.
Partial or total loss of the ability to articulate ideas or comprehend spoken or written language, resulting from damage to the brain from injury or disease.

[Greek, from aphatos, speechless : a-, not; see a-1 + phatos, spoken, speakable (from phanai, to speak; see -phasia).]

a·pha′si·ac′ (-zē-ăk′) n.
a·pha′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) adj. & n.

aphasia

(əˈfeɪzɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by partial or total loss of the ability to communicate, esp in speech or writing. Compare alexia
[C19: via New Latin from Greek, from a-1 + -phasia, from phanai to speak]
aˈphasiˌac, aˈphasic adj, n

a•pha•sia

(əˈfeɪ ʒə)

n.
the loss of a previously held ability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain.
[1865–70; < Greek: speechlessness =a- a-6 + phat(ós) spoken, v. adj. of phánai to speak + -ia -ia]
a•pha′sic, adj., n.

aphasia

Pathology. an impairment or loss of the faculty of understanding or using spoken or written language. — aphasiac, n. — aphasic, n., adj.
See also: Speech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesionaphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
acoustic aphasia, auditory aphasia, word deafness - an impairment in understanding spoken language that is not attributable to hearing loss
associative aphasia, conduction aphasia - aphasia in which the lesion is assumed to be in the association tracts connecting the various language centers in the brain; patient's have difficulty repeating a sentence just heard
global aphasia, total aphasia - loss of all ability to communicate
ataxic aphasia, Broca's aphasia, expressive aphasia, motor aphasia, nonfluent aphasia - aphasia in which expression by speech or writing is severely impaired
amnesic aphasia, amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia - inability to name objects or to recognize written or spoken names of objects
transcortical aphasia - a general term for aphasia that results from lesions outside of Broca's area or Wernicke's area of the cerebral cortex
alexia, visual aphasia, word blindness - inability to perceive written words
fluent aphasia, impressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, sensory aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia - aphasia characterized by fluent but meaningless speech and severe impairment of the ability understand spoken or written words
Translations
afasi
afasia
málstol
afasi

aphasia

[æˈfeɪzɪə] Nafasia f

aphasia

[əˈfeɪziə] (MEDICINE) naphasie f

aphasia

nAphasie f

a·pha·si·a

n. afasia, incapacidad de coordinar el pensamiento y la palabra;
amnestic ______ amnéstica;
ataxic ______ atáxica.

aphasia

n afasia, dificultad f para entender o para expresarse debida a una lesión del cerebro; expressive — afasia expresiva; receptive — afasia receptiva
References in periodicals archive ?
I also give talks worldwide about aphasia, and give support to other young stroke survivors as an ambassador for the Style For Stroke Foundation, styleforstroke.org
Pete said after his stroke he struggled with aphasia - which affects his speech and the ability to read or write.
Grace said: "There's lots of advice you get to help people with aphasia, and most of it revolves around the idea of giving them lots of space, not talking over the top of them, being very patient, don't finish their sentences for them - and what did I do?
According to the National Aphasia Association (2017), approximately 2 million Americans currently live with aphasia, and 180,000 new cases are identified each year.
Aphasia is caused by damage to parts of the brain responsible for understanding and using language.
From singing to speaking: facilitating recovery from nonfluent aphasia. Future Neurology, 5(5), 657-665.
Adler Aphasia Center is a post-rehabilitative program addressing the long-term needs of patients with aphasia and their families.
Script training was found to be an effective therapy for rejuvenating lost communication of patients with severe Broca's aphasia.
More than 350,000 people in the UK are living with aphasia, which is caused by an injury to the brain, and can make it difficult for people to talk, understand, read and write.
It is estimated that one million people in the USA has an aphasia (The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders -NIDCD-, 201 5), and the prevalence of these is between 20% and 40% after a cerebrovascular disease around the world (Martinez, Reyes-Saborit, Turtos-Carbonell and Dusu--Contreras, 2014).
Radically overhauling the fifth edition of their textbook on aphasia and other neurogenic language disorders, LaPointe and Stierwalt have dropped the chapters on selected types of aphasia, maintained the humanistic nature and the fabric of care from earlier editions, and added a chapter on the neuroanatomical basics that is richly illustrated from Thieme's deep vault of illustrations.