aphasia

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Related to aphasics: dysphasia, aphasia, verbal aphasia

a·pha·sia

 (ə-fā′zhə)
n.
Partial or total loss of the ability to articulate ideas or comprehend spoken or written language, resulting from damage to the brain from injury or disease.

[Greek, from aphatos, speechless : a-, not; see a-1 + phatos, spoken, speakable (from phanai, to speak; see -phasia).]

a·pha′si·ac′ (-zē-ăk′) n.
a·pha′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) adj. & n.

aphasia

(əˈfeɪzɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by partial or total loss of the ability to communicate, esp in speech or writing. Compare alexia
[C19: via New Latin from Greek, from a-1 + -phasia, from phanai to speak]
aˈphasiˌac, aˈphasic adj, n

a•pha•sia

(əˈfeɪ ʒə)

n.
the loss of a previously held ability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain.
[1865–70; < Greek: speechlessness =a- a-6 + phat(ós) spoken, v. adj. of phánai to speak + -ia -ia]
a•pha′sic, adj., n.

aphasia

Pathology. an impairment or loss of the faculty of understanding or using spoken or written language. — aphasiac, n. — aphasic, n., adj.
See also: Speech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesionaphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
acoustic aphasia, auditory aphasia, word deafness - an impairment in understanding spoken language that is not attributable to hearing loss
associative aphasia, conduction aphasia - aphasia in which the lesion is assumed to be in the association tracts connecting the various language centers in the brain; patient's have difficulty repeating a sentence just heard
global aphasia, total aphasia - loss of all ability to communicate
ataxic aphasia, Broca's aphasia, expressive aphasia, motor aphasia, nonfluent aphasia - aphasia in which expression by speech or writing is severely impaired
amnesic aphasia, amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia - inability to name objects or to recognize written or spoken names of objects
transcortical aphasia - a general term for aphasia that results from lesions outside of Broca's area or Wernicke's area of the cerebral cortex
alexia, visual aphasia, word blindness - inability to perceive written words
fluent aphasia, impressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, sensory aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia - aphasia characterized by fluent but meaningless speech and severe impairment of the ability understand spoken or written words
Translations
afasi
afasia
málstol
afasi

aphasia

[æˈfeɪzɪə] Nafasia f

aphasia

[əˈfeɪziə] (MEDICINE) naphasie f

aphasia

nAphasie f

a·pha·si·a

n. afasia, incapacidad de coordinar el pensamiento y la palabra;
amnestic ______ amnéstica;
ataxic ______ atáxica.

aphasia

n afasia, dificultad f para entender o para expresarse debida a una lesión del cerebro; expressive — afasia expresiva; receptive — afasia receptiva
References in periodicals archive ?
Joos) Just as child language acquisition provides individuals an unrivaled opening on the structure of language, language loss in aphasics offers them the contradictory view, but nevertheless every segment as reasonable.
A study of this type does not exist in Spanish, but the first author of this paper, in his life-long clinical experience with several thousand Spanish-speaking aphasics, has observed only two patients producing semantic paralexias when reading.
Cerebrolysin adjuvant treatment in Broca's aphasics following first acute ischemic stroke of the left middle cerebral artery.
Using reinforcement therapy and precision teaching techniques with adult aphasics.
Polyglot aphasics and language mixing: A comment on Perecman (1984).
This schema, he adds, can explain linguistic disturbances as well: among the aphasics, the use of metonymy and synecdoche compensates for the inability to select words, and the use of metaphor for the inability to combine them (55-82).
Language-related brain function during word repetition in Post-stroke aphasics.
The researchers believe that their findings may open an exciting line of research, as damage to this mechanism may explain the hesitant, non-fluent speech exhibited by those described as Broca's aphasics.
In her book, Fluent Aphasia, Susan Edwards notes that fluent aphasics comprise approximately 80% of the patients seen in the University of Reading Clinic.
Most aphasics (also called asphasiacs) fall into general groups of characteristic symptoms that can be classified as fluent or non-fluent.