aphasia

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a·pha·sia

 (ə-fā′zhə)
n.
Partial or total loss of the ability to articulate ideas or comprehend spoken or written language, resulting from damage to the brain from injury or disease.

[Greek, from aphatos, speechless : a-, not; see a-1 + phatos, spoken, speakable (from phanai, to speak; see -phasia).]

a·pha′si·ac′ (-zē-ăk′) n.
a·pha′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) adj. & n.

aphasia

(əˈfeɪzɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by partial or total loss of the ability to communicate, esp in speech or writing. Compare alexia
[C19: via New Latin from Greek, from a-1 + -phasia, from phanai to speak]
aˈphasiˌac, aˈphasic adj, n

a•pha•sia

(əˈfeɪ ʒə)

n.
the loss of a previously held ability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain.
[1865–70; < Greek: speechlessness =a- a-6 + phat(ós) spoken, v. adj. of phánai to speak + -ia -ia]
a•pha′sic, adj., n.

aphasia

Pathology. an impairment or loss of the faculty of understanding or using spoken or written language. — aphasiac, n. — aphasic, n., adj.
See also: Speech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesionaphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
acoustic aphasia, auditory aphasia, word deafness - an impairment in understanding spoken language that is not attributable to hearing loss
associative aphasia, conduction aphasia - aphasia in which the lesion is assumed to be in the association tracts connecting the various language centers in the brain; patient's have difficulty repeating a sentence just heard
global aphasia, total aphasia - loss of all ability to communicate
ataxic aphasia, Broca's aphasia, expressive aphasia, motor aphasia, nonfluent aphasia - aphasia in which expression by speech or writing is severely impaired
amnesic aphasia, amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia - inability to name objects or to recognize written or spoken names of objects
transcortical aphasia - a general term for aphasia that results from lesions outside of Broca's area or Wernicke's area of the cerebral cortex
alexia, visual aphasia, word blindness - inability to perceive written words
fluent aphasia, impressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, sensory aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia - aphasia characterized by fluent but meaningless speech and severe impairment of the ability understand spoken or written words
Translations
afasi
afasia
málstol
afasi

aphasia

[æˈfeɪzɪə] Nafasia f

aphasia

[əˈfeɪziə] (MEDICINE) naphasie f

aphasia

nAphasie f

a·pha·si·a

n. afasia, incapacidad de coordinar el pensamiento y la palabra;
amnestic ______ amnéstica;
ataxic ______ atáxica.

aphasia

n afasia, dificultad f para entender o para expresarse debida a una lesión del cerebro; expressive — afasia expresiva; receptive — afasia receptiva
References in periodicals archive ?
Coelho, "Direct attention training as a treatment for reading impairment in mild aphasia," Aphasiology, vol.
A pesar de que esta disciplina empezo su andadura en los anos 70 de la mano de David Crystal, no fue hasta dos decadas mas tarde cuando recalo en la cultura hispanoamericana, siendo la tradicion anglofona, desde sus inicios, la puntera en temas de investigacion clinica, donde destacan publicaciones como las revistas Brain and Language, Aphasiology o Journal of Neurolinguistics, que junto con la Asociacion Internacional de Linguistica y Fonetica Clinica a traves de su organismo de difusion cientifica, Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, celebra congresos bianuales y edita revistas de periodicidad mensual.
Originally published in the journal Aphasiology, vol.
Helm-Estabrooks, Albert, and Nicholas incorporate the latest findings in aphasiology, neuroscience and neuro-imaging, computer science, and complementary treatments, and emphasize the significance of patient self-determination and participation.