aphelion

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aphelion

a·phe·li·on

 (ə-fē′lē-ən, ăp-hē′-)
n. pl. a·phe·li·a (-lē-ə)
The point on the orbit of a celestial body that is farthest from the sun.

[From New Latin aphēlium : Greek apo-, apo- + Greek hēlios, sun; see sāwel- in Indo-European roots.]

aphelion

(æpˈhiːlɪən; əˈfiː-)
n, pl -lia (-lɪə)
(Astronomy) the point in its orbit when a planet or comet is at its greatest distance from the sun. Compare perihelion
[C17: from New Latin aphēlium (with pseudo-Greek ending -ion) from ap- + Greek hēlios sun]
apˈhelian adj

a•phe•li•on

(əˈfi li ən, əˈfil yən, æpˈhi li ən)

n., pl. a•phe•li•a (əˈfi li ə, əˈfil yə, æpˈhi li ə)
the point in the orbit of a planet or a comet at which it is farthest from the sun. Compare perihelion.
[1650–60; Hellenized form of New Latin aphēlium < Greek *aphḗlion (diástēma) off-sun (distance), neuter of *aphḗlios (adj.) =ap- ap-2 + -hēlios, adj. derivative of hḗlios sun. See apogee]
a•phe′li•an, adj.
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aphelion

a·phe·li·on

(ə-fē′lē-ən)
The point farthest from the sun in the orbit of a body, such as a planet or a comet, that travels around the sun.

aphelion

the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is farthest from the sun. Cf. perihelion.
See also: Astronomy
the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is farthest from the sun. See also perihelion.
See also: Planets

aphelion

The point in a planet’s orbit at which it is farthest from the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphelion - apoapsis in solar orbitaphelion - apoapsis in solar orbit; the point in the orbit of a planet or comet that is at the greatest distance from the sun
apoapsis, point of apoapsis - (astronomy) the point in an orbit farthest from the body being orbited
perihelion - periapsis in solar orbit; the point in the orbit of a planet or comet where it is nearest to the sun
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, Jupiter's gravitational influence has herded about two-thirds of all short-period comets into orbits having aphelia near Jupiter's orbit.
After the 1916 shower the renowned British meteor observer William Denning noticed that the meteors seemed to share an orbit with Comet 7P/Pons-Winnecke, a member of the Jupiter family of short-period comets--those that have aphelia (far points) at about Jupiter's mean distance from the Sun.