aphid


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a·phid

 (ā′fĭd, ăf′ĭd)
n.
Any of various small, soft-bodied insects of the superfamily Aphidoidea that feed by sucking sap from plants and that can reproduce asexually. Also called plant louse.

[New Latin Aphis, Aphid-, type genus, coined by Carolus Linnaeus, perhaps as a back-formed singular *Aphīs, from plural *Aphīdes, irregularly derived from Greek apheideis, plural of apheidēs, unsparing, unmerciful, lavish (in reference to the damage caused by aphids or to their high reproductive rate) : a-, not; see a-1 + pheidesthai, to spare, be merciful, live thriftily; see bheid- in Indo-European roots.]

a·phid′i·an (ə-fĭd′ē-ən) adj. & n.

aphid

(ˈeɪfɪd)
n
(Animals) any of the small homopterous insects of the family Aphididae, which feed by sucking the juices from plants. Also called: plant louse See also greenfly, blackfly
[C19: back formation from aphides, plural of aphis]
aphidian adj, n
aˈphidious adj

a•phid

(ˈeɪ fɪd, ˈæf ɪd)

n.
any of numerous tiny soft-bodied insects of the family Aphididae that suck the sap from the stems and leaves of various plants. Also called plant louse.
[1880–85; back formation from aphides, pl. of aphis]
a•phid•i•an (əˈfɪd i ən) adj., n.

a·phid

(ā′fĭd, ăf′ĭd)
Any of various small, soft-bodied insects that feed by sucking sap from plants. Aphids can be very destructive and can transmit plant diseases.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphid - any of various small plant-sucking insectsaphid - any of various small plant-sucking insects
plant louse, louse - any of several small insects especially aphids that feed by sucking the juices from plants
Aphis pomi, apple aphid, green apple aphid - bright green aphid; feeds on and causes curling of apple leaves
Aphis fabae, bean aphid, blackfly - blackish aphid that infests e.g. beans and sugar beets
greenfly - greenish aphid; pest on garden and crop plants
ant cow - excretes a honeylike substance eaten by ants
woolly aphid, woolly plant louse - secretes a waxy substance like a mass of fine curly white cotton or woolly threads
Translations
أرَقَه، مَنَّه
mšice
bladlus
kirva
blaîlús
amaras
laputs
yaprak biti

aphid

[ˈeɪfɪd] Náfido m

aphid

[ˈeɪfɪd] npuceron m

aphid

nBlattlaus f

aphid

[ˈeɪfɪd] nafide m

aphid

(ˈeifid) noun
a very small insect that lives on plants, especially a greenfly.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Figure 6, the relationship of the fitting between the mobile APP count and the manual count is y = 1.04846x - 2.29425; the fit degree [R.sup.2] factor is up to 0.99504, indicating that the aphid recognition and mobile APP counting can be used to achieve functions of recognition and counting.
In Khanewal, one hot spot of white fly, three hot spots of Aphid, Thrips (2) and armyworm (2) were witnessed.
In Khanewal, three hot spots of white fly, four hot spots of Aphid, Thrips (1) and armyworm (1) were witnessed.
Aphid (4), Thrips (1), and Mealy Bug (1) reported from Sahiwal.
Application of insecticides is one way to control cabbage aphid in canola (Amer et al., 2010; Lashkari et al., 2007).
Also, aphid abundance was correlated with the number of mummies using Pearson rank correlation test.
The longest survivor of adults was observed on dried aphid followed by frozen and fresh aphid of A.
Experiments were carried at the laboratory of Plant Production and Protection Department at Al-Balqa, Applied University, Jordan, to evaluate the efficacy of those extracts against peach-potato aphid. Three concentrations (100, 1000, and 10000 ppm) of each extract were prepared by dissolving the oil extract in 0.01 (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution.
It was observed that BARD-699 cultivar showed comparatively high resistance with minimum aphid population (4.60 per leaf) and leaf infestation (22%) at 110 days after treatment (DAS).Whereas, the cultivar BARD-
Aphids will thrive in these conditions, breeding rapidly, invading stems of plants and sucking the life out of them; sawfly larvae can devastate roses; slugs and snails will feast on hostas, bedding plants and much more during rainstorms, and earwigs will munch on the leaves and flowers of your prized clematis, dahlias, carnations, chrysanthemums and delphiniums.