aphorism

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aph·o·rism

 (ăf′ə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. A tersely phrased statement of a truth or opinion; an adage. See Synonyms at saying.
2. A brief statement of a scientific principle.

[French aphorisme, from Old French, from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos, from aphorizein, to delimit, define : apo-, apo- + horizein, to delimit, define; see horizon.]

aph′o·rist n.
aph′o·ris′tic (-rĭs′tĭk) adj.
aph′o·ris′ti·cal·ly adv.

aphorism

(ˈæfəˌrɪzəm)
n
a short pithy saying expressing a general truth; maxim
[C16: from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos definition, from aphorizein to define, set limits to, from horos boundary]
ˈaphorist n

aph•o•rism

(ˈæf əˌrɪz əm)

n.
a terse saying embodying a general truth or astute observation, as “Art is long, life is short.”
[1520–30; French aphorisme < Late Latin aphorismus < Greek aphorismós definition =aphor(ízein) to define + -ismos -ism]
aph′o•rist, n.

aphorism

a terse saying embodying a general truth, as “Time flies.” — aphorist, n. — aphorismic, aphorismical, aphoristic, adj.
See also: Proverbs

aphorism

A brief, witty statement of a general truth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphorism - a short pithy instructive saying
axiom, maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits

aphorism

noun saying, maxim, gnome, adage, proverb, dictum, precept, axiom, apothegm, saw one of his favoured aphorisms

aphorism

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations
aforisme
aforismusaforizmus
aforisme
aforizam

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzəm] Naforismo m

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzəm] n (= witticism) → aphorisme m

aphorism

nAphorismus m

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzm] naforisma m
References in periodicals archive ?
As Filippo La Porta has noted, because of the Young Cannibals' mimesis of pop culture, they might be better defined as "moralists, as analysts of social mores, anthropologists, aphorists, essayists" rather than creative writers (72).
The aphorists in Short Flights are three-quarters male.
On the other hand, he overwrites, to a point where the reader begins to pine for the brilliant French aphorists of yesteryear who could capture in one sentence what takes Zemmour page after page.
10) Just as aphorists may be forced to reconsider a common adage, and scientists obliged to reevaluate the permanency of extinction, de-extinction illustrates how policymakers need to reformulate legal frameworks governing natural resources to be less dependent on simplistic dualisms in favor of cautious risk assessment that recognizes the dynamism of nature and humanity's indivisibility from it.