aplomb

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a·plomb

 (ə-plŏm′, ə-plŭm′)
n.
Self-confident assurance; poise: "It is native personality ... that endows a man to stand before presidents or generals ... with aplomb" (Walt Whitman).

[French, from Old French a plomb, perpendicularly : a, according to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + plomb, lead weight (from Latin plumbum, lead).]

aplomb

(əˈplɒm)
n
equanimity, self-confidence, or self-possession
[C18: from French: rectitude, uprightness, from à plomb according to the plumb line, vertically]

a•plomb

(əˈplɒm, əˈplʌm)

n.
imperturbable self-possession, poise, or assurance.
[1820–30; < French à plomb according to the plummet, i.e., straight up and down, vertical position]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aplomb - great coolness and composure under strainaplomb - great coolness and composure under strain; "keep your cool"
calm, calmness, composure, equanimity - steadiness of mind under stress; "he accepted their problems with composure and she with equanimity"

aplomb

aplomb

noun
Translations

aplomb

[əˈplɒm] N (liter) → aplomo m
with great aplombcon gran aplomo or serenidad

aplomb

[əˈplɒm] nsang-froid m, assurance f

aplomb

nGelassenheit f; with aplombgelassen

aplomb

[əˈplɒm] ndisinvoltura
with great aplomb → senza scomporsi, con gran disinvoltura
References in classic literature ?
As I walked by her side that May morning, I was only conscious of her voice and her exquisite girlhood; for though she talked with the APLOMB of a woman of the world, a passionate candour and simple ardour in her manner would have betrayed her, had her face not plainly declared her the incarnation of twenty.
Welland and her sister-in-law were facing their semicircle of critics with the Mingottian APLOMB which old Catherine had inculcated in all her tribe, and that only May Welland betrayed, by a heightened colour
"Notre Pere qui etes au ciel" went off like a shot; then followed an address to Marie "vierge celeste, reine des anges, maison d'or, tour d'ivoire!" and then an invocation to the saint of the day; and then down they all sat, and the solemn (?) rite was over; and I entered, flinging the door wide and striding in fast, as it was my wont to do now; for I had found that in entering with aplomb, and mounting the estrade with emphasis, consisted the grand secret of ensuring immediate silence.