apodeictic


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apodeictic

(ˌæpəˈdaɪktɪk) or

apodictic

adj
1. unquestionably true by virtue of demonstration
2. (Logic) logic archaic
a. necessarily true
b. asserting that a property holds necessarily
[C17: from Latin apodīcticus, from Greek apodeiktikos clearly demonstrating, from apodeiknunai to demonstrate]
ˌapoˈdeictically, ˌapoˈdictically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.apodeictic - of a proposition; necessarily true or logically certain
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
true - consistent with fact or reality; not false; "the story is true"; "it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true"- B. Russell; "the true meaning of the statement"
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in these theses Kant means not a general and uncertain "philosophical" idea of space, but the quite particular to be used in physics: "For geometrical principles are always apodeictic, that is, united with the consciousness of their necessity, as: "Space has only three dimensions.
Murphy notes that Judeo-Christian rhetors would consider appeals to scripture to be 'absolute, apodeictic proof' (Rhetoric in the Middle Ages: A History of Rhetorical Theory from St.
Indicating the limits of the apodeictic method, the Tahafut makes room for the epistemological claims of prophecy and mystical cognition, hence criticizing the philosopher's arguments rather than his conclusions.
Although philosophy, genuine science, can only be approximated gradually, it is reached by appealing to the eidos, the pure a priori, which anybody can grasp in apodeictic insight.
The initial contrast is that apodeictic is two premise categorical syllogistic, whereas dialectic "collects general formal principles or topoi and subsumes general cases under them" (p.
Part 1 searches the rhetorical background of Iago's and Othello's respective speech habits, the one characteristically ingenious and the other apodeictic.
The important point in this for Kung is the unconditional nature of this kind of supreme norm: "a norm which is not just hypothetical and conditioned but is categorical, apodeictic and unconditioned-utterly practicable in the face of the extremely complex situation in which the individual or groups must often act.