apodosis


Also found in: Wikipedia.

a·pod·o·sis

 (ə-pŏd′ə-sĭs)
n. pl. a·pod·o·ses (-sēz′)
The main clause of a conditional sentence, as The game will be canceled in The game will be canceled if it rains.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from apodidonai, to give back : apo-, apo- + didonai, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apodosis

(əˈpɒdəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Logic) logic grammar the consequent of a conditional statement, as the game will be cancelled in if it rains the game will be cancelled. Compare protasis
2. (Grammar) logic grammar the consequent of a conditional statement, as the game will be cancelled in if it rains the game will be cancelled. Compare protasis
[C17: via Late Latin from Greek: a returning or answering (clause), from apodidonai to give back]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•pod•o•sis

(əˈpɒd ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
the clause expressing the consequence in a conditional sentence, as then I will in If you go, then I will; conclusion. Compare protasis (def. 1).
[1630–40; < Late Latin < Greek: a returning, answering clause]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

apodosis

the clause that expresses the consequence in a conditional sentence. Cf. protasis.
See also: Grammar
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

apodosis

[əˈpɒdəsɪs] Napódosis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(RS 18.06-17.365: 11'-15') The injunctions nerta lipusunissu and lihalliqusu in the apodosis echo both forms of violence expressed in the protasis, nerta eppas and ana hulluqi.
focus on if-clauses of conditionals, David Lewis and Rob Van Der van der Sandt feature presuppositional expressions in the apodosis. Lewis defines accommodation as a mechanism, which inserts the required presupposition into the local context of the statement.
Accordingly, whilst the concept of the 'chief-part' stands clear in the protasis and in the final statement, the apodosis conveys the means by which the relationship of subordination works.
This represents a pragmatically-marked situation, and the narrator strongly encodes the stepmother's intent by assigning PMA marking to the 1st person pronoun in the apodosis.
The apodosis is the consequence of a condition, such as "make lemonade".