Apollo

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A·pol·lo

 (ə-pŏl′ō)
n.
1. Greek Mythology The god of prophecy, music, medicine, and poetry, sometimes identified with the sun.
2. apollo pl. apol·los A young man of great physical beauty.

[Latin Apollō, from Greek Apollōn.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apollo

(əˈpɒləʊ)
n, pl -los
a strikingly handsome youth

apollo

(əˈpɒləʊ)
n, pl -los
(Animals) a handsome Eurasian mountain butterfly, Parnassius apollo, with palish wings and prominent red ocelli

Apollo

(əˈpɒləʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the god of light, poetry, music, healing, and prophecy: son of Zeus and Leto

Apollo

(əˈpɒləʊ)
n
(Astronautics) any of a series of manned US spacecraft designed to explore the moon and surrounding space. Apollo 11 made the first moon landing in July 1969
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

A•pol•lo

(əˈpɒl oʊ)

n., pl. -los.
1. the ancient Greek and Roman god of light, healing, music, and poetry.
2. a handsome young man.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Apollo - (Greek mythology) Greek god of lightApollo - (Greek mythology) Greek god of light; god of prophecy and poetry and music and healing; son of Zeus and Leto; twin brother of Artemis
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ApollApollon
ApolloApollón
アポロアポロン

Apollo

[əˈpɒleʊ] NApolo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Apollo

n (Myth) → Apollo m; (fig also)Apoll m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Apollo

[əˈpɒləʊ] nApollo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Thucydides quotes the Delian "Hymn to Apollo", and it is possible that the Homeric corpus of his day also contained other of the more important hymns.
Thucydides, in quoting the "Hymn to Apollo", calls it PROOIMION, which ordinarily means a `prelude' chanted by a rhapsode before recitation of a lay from Homer, and such hymns as Nos.
The "Hymn to Apollo" consists of two parts, which beyond any doubt were originally distinct, a Delian hymn and a Pythian hymn.
Now Chryses had come to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and had brought with him a great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo wreathed with a suppliant's wreath, and he besought the Achaeans, but most of all the two sons of Atreus, who were their chiefs.
"Sons of Atreus," he cried, "and all other Achaeans, may the gods who dwell in Olympus grant you to sack the city of Priam, and to reach your homes in safety; but free my daughter, and accept a ransom for her, in reverence to Apollo, son of Jove."
A CROW caught in a snare prayed to Apollo to release him, making a vow to offer some frankincense at his shrine.
He calls himself the New Priest of Apollo, and he worships the sun."
The man who called himself Kalon was a magnificent creature, worthy, in a physical sense, to be the pontiff of Apollo. He was nearly as tall even as Flambeau, and very much better looking, with a golden beard, strong blue eyes, and a mane flung back like a lion's.
If we really saw Erik, what I ought to have done was to nail him to Apollo's lyre, just as we nail the owls to the walls of our Breton farms; and there would have been no more question of him."
"My dear Raoul, you would first have had to climb up to Apollo's lyre: that is no easy matter."
But Agamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with one another, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed the stone floor to consult the oracle.
This in fact was how Eurytus came prematurely by his end, for Apollo was angry with him and killed him because he challenged him as an archer.