apolune


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Related to apolune: perilune

a·po·lune

 (ăp′ə-lo͞on′)
n.
The point in an orbit around the moon where the orbiting body is farthest from the moon.

[apo- + Latin lūna, moon; see lune.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apolune

(ˈæpəˌluːn)
n
(Astronautics) the point in a lunar orbit when a spacecraft is at its greatest distance from the moon. Compare apocynthion, perilune
[C20: from apo- + -lune, from Latin lūna moon]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ap•o•lune

(ˈæp əˌlun)

n.
the point in a lunar orbit that is farthest from the moon.
[1965–70; apo- + -lune < Latin lūna moon]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

apolune

in an orbit around a moon, the point furthest from the moon. Cf. perilune.
See also: Astronomy
the farthest point from the moon in a lunar orbit, as that of a spacecraft. Also called apocynthion.
See also: Planets
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

apolune

The point in an orbit of the Moon at which the orbiting object is farthest from the Moon.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apolune - apoapsis in orbit around the moonapolune - apoapsis in orbit around the moon  
apoapsis, point of apoapsis - (astronomy) the point in an orbit farthest from the body being orbited
perilune, periselene - periapsis in orbit around the moon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Greek and Roman mythology, goddesses Selene and Diana were alternatively called 'Cynthia' and it is intriguing to note that all three names are reflected in the terminology for lunar orbits - 'Apolune', 'Pericynthion' and 'Selenocentric'.
The initial distance of Luna 10 from the lunar surface was 350 km at perilune and 1015 km at apolune, and it transmitted its own signal until May 30, 1966.