apophatic


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Related to apophatic: cataphatic

apophatic

(ˌæpəˈfætɪk)
adj
of or relating to the belief that God can only be described by a process of negation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.apophatic - of or relating to the belief that God can be known to humans only in terms of what He is not (such as `God is unknowable')
Translations
apophatisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Theologically, the act of witnessing through "non-words" provides a possibility of noncataphatic missiology, or, in other words: apophatic missiology!
However, despite calls and demands to use more actively in philosophical studies the theological methods of the knowledge of God--especially the apophatic one--and the experience of the patristic heritage, the Russian religious philosophers did not avoid problems while implementing their ideas.
While acknowledging the plethora of evidence that Lovecraft was an atheist, the authors point out that Lovecraft's relationship to the apophatic is strong and runs deeply through his writings.
Maturity can include being empty: waiting, having nothing to say (apophatic rather than cataphatic spirituality).
Her topics include three complementary methods, apophatic aspects of theological conversion, a non-synthetic dialectics, from schism to sharing God's gifts beyond the institutional borders, memory and remembering in the post-communist context, and religious belonging in a changing Europe.
The second chapter is an examination of several conceptions of democracy that Dallmayr finds wanting, including minimalist, agonist, deliberative, and "apophatic" (Derrida).
Gary Poe, professor of history at Palm Beach Atlantic University, investigates the apophatic spirituality of Gregory of Nyssa.
apophatic, rationalist--participatory, nondenominational, open to others
Ultimately, Undandy is an apophatic term, stating something whilst negating it.
"Passion for Nothing: Kierkegaard's Apophatic Theology" by Peter Kline (Academic Dean and Lecturer in Systematic Theology at St.
Later, in their chapter 'Russian Icons, Dada Liturgies and Rumors of Nihilism,' the authors carefully present the increasingly accepted view that Kazimir Malevich's abstractions were informed by a kind of apophatic theology.
For Agamben, the discrepancy between man and animal will wither away only by remodeling knowledge through a theoretical discourse that will be identified here as "apophatic pragmatism".