apoplexy

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ap·o·plex·y

 (ăp′ə-plĕk′sē)
n.
1. Sudden impairment of neurological function, especially that resulting from a cerebral hemorrhage; a stroke.
2. A sudden effusion of blood into an organ or tissue.
3. A fit of extreme anger; rage: "The proud ... members suffered collective apoplexy, and this year they are out for blood" (David Finch).

[Middle English apoplexie, from Old French, from Late Latin apoplēxia, from Greek apoplēxiā, from apoplēssein, apoplēg-, to cripple by a stroke : apo-, intensive pref.; see apo- + plēssein, to strike; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apoplexy

(ˈæpəˌplɛksɪ)
n
(Pathology) sudden loss of consciousness, often followed by paralysis, caused by rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel in the brain
[C14: from Old French apoplexie, from Late Latin apoplēxia, from Greek: from apoplēssein to cripple by a stroke, from plēssein to strike]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ap•o•plex•y

(ˈæp əˌplɛk si)

n.
2. a sudden, usu. marked, loss of bodily function due to rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin apoplexia < Greek]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apoplexy - a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brainapoplexy - a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
ischaemic stroke, ischemic stroke - the most common kind of stroke; caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain (as from a clot blocking a blood vessel)
haemorrhagic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke - stroke caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
cerebral hemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

apoplexy

noun
1. fit, attack, heart attack, seizure, convulsion, paroxysm In 1685, Charles II died of apoplexy.
2. anger, rage, outrage, fury, indignation, ire, antagonism, exasperation, vexation He has caused apoplexy with his books on class and war.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

apoplexy

[ˈæpəpleksɪ] N
1. (Med) (o.f.) → apoplejía f
2. (= rage) → cólera f, ira f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

apoplexy

[ˈæpəplɛksi] n (MEDICINE)apoplexie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

apoplexy

nApoplexie f (spec), → Schlaganfall m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

apoplexy

[ˈæpəplɛksɪ] napoplessia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ap·o·plexy

n. apoplejía, hemorragia cerebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
No longer will we have to suffer the traumas of a disengaged people, the professor can guarantee a cure fo r tantrums, apoplexies and feelings of grandeur.
For example, Cheyne conveys the idea that in `plethoric' or `sanguineous' apoplexies the blood has a pressure of its own: "we find that every vessel within the head has been in a state of excitement .
Whereas apoplexies caused by `obstruction' and those caused by haemorrhage had traditionally been considered as distinct, the theory developed that they were both dependent upon degeneration of the arterial wall [29].